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CLICK HERE FOR A FULL LIST OF ALL NICOLAS TRUDGIAN PRINTS BY TITLE

Nicolas Trudgian Prints . com

All of the superb range of aviation and naval art prints by renowned artist Nicolas Trudgian, in one easy to navigate gallery.  Listing all prints from the RAF, Luftwaffe, United States Air Force and more - all of Nicolas Trudgians prints in one place.  Nicolas Trudgian Prints . com show all available aviation and naval prints published over the years by the Military Gallery, available from Cranston Fine Arts, the Military and Aviation Art Print Company.

 

 


Buy with confidence and security!
Publishing historical art since 1985

 

Aviation Print Packs
Douglas Dakota Aircraft Prints by Nicolas Trudgian and Graeme Lothian.
Invasion Force by Nicolas Trudgian.
Invasion Force by Nicolas Trudgian.
Market Garden. Arnhem by Graeme Lothian.

Market Garden. Arnhem by Graeme Lothian.
Save 145!
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Discount B-17 Flying Fortress Aviation Prints by Nicolas Trudgian and Graeme Lothian.
Return to Rattlesden by Nicolas Trudgian.

Return to Rattlesden by Nicolas Trudgian.
Defenders of the Reich by Graeme Lothian.

Defenders of the Reich by Graeme Lothian.
Save 225!
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Pack 569. Pack of two American B29 Flying Fortress prints by Philip West and Nicolas Trudgian.
The Memphis Belle by Philip West.
The Memphis Belle by Philip West.
First Strike on Berlin by Nicolas Trudgian.

First Strike on Berlin by Nicolas Trudgian.
Save 220!
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Gunther Seeger Pilot Signed Luftwaffe Aviation Art by Ivan Berryman and Nicolas Trudgian.
High Pursuit by Ivan Berryman. (D)

High Pursuit by Ivan Berryman. (D)
Stormclouds Gather by Nicolas Trudgian

Stormclouds Gather by Nicolas Trudgian
Save 170!
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Pack 673. Pack of two Hawker Typhoon prints by Robert Taylor and Nicolas Trudgian.
Closing the Gap by Robert Taylor. (C)

Closing the Gap by Robert Taylor. (C)
Typhoons at Falaise by Nicolas Trudgian. (B)

Typhoons at Falaise by Nicolas Trudgian. (B)
Save 170!
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Latest Nicolas Trudgian Print Offers : 

<b>Only 50 copies available.
V.E. Day - Heading Home by Nicolas Trudgian.
Was : 220
Now 170.00!
 Messerschmitt Me262s of JG7 race back to their base at Brandenburg after intercepting a USAAF bomber raid on Munich, and Luftwaffe air bases in the area. Below them a B-26 has crash-landed in the fields still covered with a sprinkling of late winter snow. In the distance the afternoon sun glistens on the Bavarian Alpine mountains.

Return of the Hunters by Nicolas Trudgian.
Was : 480
Now 430.00!
 June 1944, dawn is breaking over a sleepy English village, and P-38 Lightnings shatter the silence as they climb out from a nearby air base, en route to the Normandy beach heads.

Dawn Chorus by Nicolas Trudgian. (B)
Was : 550
Now 500.00!
 Hannes Trautloft in his FW190 leading his famous JG54 bring down a Russian Petlyakov Pe-2 on the Eastern Front in 1943. This dramatic painting is set in a superb winter landscape.
Winter Combat by Nicolas Trudgian. (B)
Was : 310
Now 260.00!

FEATURED SIGNATURE



Lieutenant Joseph W Cannon

He enlisted in the USAAF in 1942 and after completing training joined the 363rd Fighter Squadron, 357th Fightr Group based at Leiston, flying P-51s alongside such legendary aces as Bud Anderson and Chuck Yeager. From September 1944 he flew 303 combat hours in 72 missions over Europe in his Mustang Little Joe, twice force-landed in Belgium in October 1944 and damaged two aircraft in the air, including an Me262 jet over Leipzig in March 1945.

Click for artwork signed by this person

Other Aviation Artists

 

All Our Latest Aviation Releases : 

  Seen here in company with other 485 Sqn machines, Spitfire Mk.IXc ML407 is depicted over the Normandy beaches shortly after D-Day.  Flown by New Zealander Fl Lt Johnnie Houlton, this aircraft claimed a Ju.88 on 6th June and shared in the destruction of another on the same day.  Coded 'V' in honour of his wife, Vickie, ML407 is still flying today, now converted to a two-seater and regularly displayed by Carolyn Grace.

Guardians of the Beaches by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
 Despite crippling damage to their Lancaster ED925 (G), the crew of AJ-M continued to press home their attack on the Mohne Dam on the night of 16th/17th May 1943. With both port engines ablaze, Flt Lt J V Hopgood forced his blazing aircraft on, releasing the Upkeep bomb just precious seconds too late to strike the dam, the mine instead bouncing over the wall and onto the power station below with devastating results. ED925 attempted to recover from the maelstrom, but the fuel fire was too intense and the aircraft was tragically lost, just two of her crew managing to escape the impact to spend the rest of the war as PoWs.

No Way Back by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
  Following the successful attack on the Mohne dam on the night of 16th/17th May 1943, three Lancasters of 617 Sqn turned their attention to the Eder, some twelve minutes flying time away, accompanied by Wing Commander Guy Gibson to oversee the next attack. After several aborted attempts to obtain the correct height and direction for their bomb run by Flight Lieutenant Shannon (AJ-L) and  Squadron Leader H E Maudslay (AJ-Z), Gibson called in Maudslay to try again. During his second approach, he released his Upkeep bomb too late. It struck the top of the dam wall and bounced back into the air where it exploded right behind Maudslay's aircraft, lighting up the entire valley and causing considerable damage to the aircraft that had dropped it. Despite what must have been crippling damage, AJ-Z did manage to limp away from the scene and begin the return journey, but Maudslay and all his crew were sadly lost when their aircraft was shot down by flak at Emmerich-Klein-Netterdn. The Eder was finally successfully breached by Pilot Officer Les Knight's aircraft, ED912(G), AJ-N, which returned safely.

Tragedy at the Eder by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
 Flying low across the North Sea en route to the Sorpe Dam on the night of 16th/17th May 1943 as part of Operation Chastise, Flying Officer Geoff Rice's Lancaster ED936(G) clipped a large wave, ripping the Upkeep bomb from its mountings and pitching the aircraft into the sea. Somehow, in just a split second, Rice managed to haul AJ-H back into the air, but the aircraft had ingested a huge amount of water and, as Rice put his Lancaster into a climb to head back to Scampton, rear gunner Sgt S Burns and his turret were almost swept away as the water rushed to the back of the aircraft. AJ-H returned to Scampton otherwise unscathed and took no further part in the Dams Raids.

A Lucky Escape by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
 En route to the Ruhr Dams on the night of 16/17 May 1943, P/O W C Townsend, demonstrating great skill, flew his aircraft, ED886(G) 'O'- Orange below tree-top height through a forest firetrap on his way to the Ennepe Dam, a feat carried out by moonlight alone.  AJ-O made it successfully to its target where the Upkeep bomb was observed to hit the dam, but with no effect, before returning safely to base the following morning.

Undetected by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
  This was the moment when the massive Möhne dam was finally breached on the night of 16th-17th May 1943 during the top secret Operation Chastise. The specially-converted Lancaster B MkIII of Fl/Lt David Maltby ED906(G) AJ-J roars between the towers of the dam, having released the Upkeep bouncing bomb that would ultimately cause a cascade of water to flood into the valley below. Fl/Lt Harold Martin's identical aircraft, ED909(G) AJ-P can be seen off Maltby's port wing with all of its light ablaze, drawing enemy fire from the attacking bomber.

Dambusters - Moment of Truth by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
 The Lancaster B MkIII of Flt Lt J V Hopgood was the second aircraft to make an attempt at breaching the Möhne Dam on the night of 16/17th of May 1943.    Already damaged by flak en route to their target, the embattled Lancaster ED925(G) (AJ-M) encountered intense flak and 20mm fire from the shore and from the towers of the dam itself. Flying Officer Gregory's front gun turret had taken the full force of the flak burst during the journey, killing him instantly, and Hopgood himself was almost certainly wounded in the same explosion.  Nevertheless, they pressed home their attack but, just moments from the release of the Upkeep bomb, both of Hopgood's port engines took direct hits and burst into flames, and other rounds ripped through the starboard wing. Perhaps distracted by the sudden conflagration, Hopgood's aircraft released its bomb just seconds too late to be effective.  The bomb bounced over the dam wall, landing on the power station below where it exploded with devastating results.  With blazing fuel now engulfing the wing of his crippled aircraft, Hopgood climbed to about 500ft where the wing failed, sending ED925 into a dive from which it would never recover. By jumping clear, clutching their parachutes just moments before impact, two of her crew survived to become prisoners of war.

Bravest of the Brave by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
 Of the five Lancasters that formed the Second Wave of Operation Chastise, just one aircraft made it to the target, the Sorpe Dam, on the night of 16th/17th May 1943. American pilot Joe McCarthy had been forced to switch to the reserve aircraft due to technical difficulties and subsequently took off slightly later than his less fortunate comrades, all of whom fell either to German flak or to mishaps on their perilous journey. Upon arrival, McCarthy found the view of the dam itself to be unobscured, although mist in the surrounding valleys made it difficult to gauge his approach. As this was not a masonry dam, a different tactic was employed to the Möhne and Eder which involved flying along the length of the dam and dropping the Upkeep bomb, unspun, directly onto it. Their task was made all the more difficult by the fact that their approach necessitated McCarthy bringing AJ-T low over the hilltop village of Langsheid whose Church spire occupied the very point at which the aircraft had to pass to get a good run upon the dam. Undaunted and with great skill, ED825(G) made its run and released the bomb onto the dam, unassisted by the spotlight altimeter device that had proved so useful at the Möhne and Eder as AJ-T had not been fitted with this aid. Nevertheless, the Upkeep struck the dam and exploded as planned, sadly with little effect. McCarthy and his brave crew returned safely to Scampton, their landing made slightly difficult by a tyre that had been damaged by light flak on the return journey. The Sorpe was attacked again in the small hours of the morning when Flight Sergeant Ken Brown's aircraft, AJ-F of the Third Wave arrived, once more striking the dam successfully, but again without breaching it.

Attack on the Sorpe by Ivan Berryman. (PC)

Signatures

Some popular pilot and aircrew signatures from our database of over 2,000 signatures!

Erich Rudorffer

Raymond Grayston

Bud Anderson

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Normandy Fighter Sweep by Nicolas Trudgian. (B)

Normandy Fighter Sweep by Nicolas Trudgian. (B)
Price : 65.00
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Spirit of the Mountain by Nicolas Trudgian (Y)

Spirit of the Mountain by Nicolas Trudgian (Y)
Price : 70.00
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Desert Sharks and Eagles by Nicolas Trudgian. (Y)

Desert Sharks and Eagles by Nicolas Trudgian. (Y)
Price : 125.00
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Tiger! Tiger! by Nicolas Trudgian. (XX)
Tiger! Tiger! by Nicolas Trudgian. (XX)
Price : 130.00
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Trainbusters by Nicolas Trudgian. (Y)

Trainbusters by Nicolas Trudgian. (Y)
Price : 55.00
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Having graduated from art college, Nicolas Trudgian spent many years as a professional illustrator before turning to a career in fine art painting. His crisp style of realism, attention to detail, compositional skills and bright use of colours, immediately found favour with collectors and demand for his original work soared on both sides of the Atlantic. Today, more than a decade after becoming a fine art painter, Nicolas Trudgian is firmly established within a tiny, elite group of aviation artists whose works are genuinely collected world-wide.  When he paints an aircraft you can be sure he has researched it in every detail and when he puts it over a particular airfield, the chances are he has paid it a recent visit. Even when he paints a sunset over a tropical island, or mist hanging over a valley in China, most probably he has seen it with his own eyes.

Nick was born and raised in the seafaring city of Plymouth, the port from which the Pilgrim Fathers set sail in 1620, and where Sir Francis Drake played bowls while awaiting the Spanish Armada. Growing up in a house close to the railway station within a busy military city, the harbour always teeming with naval vessels and the skies above resonating with the sounds of naval aircraft, it was not at all surprising the young Nick became fascinated with trains, boats and aircraft. It was from his father, himself a talented artist, that Nick acquired his love of drawing and surrounded by so much that was inspiring, there was never a shortage of ideas for pictures. His talent began to show at an early age and although he did well enough at school, he always spent a disproportionate amount of time drawing. People talked about him becoming a Naval officer or an architect but in 1975 Nick's mind was made up. When he told his careers teacher he wanted to go to art school the man said, 'Now come on, what do you really want to do?"

After leaving school Nick began a one-year foundation course at the Plymouth College of Art. Now armed with an impressive portfolio containing paintings of jet aircraft, trains, even wildlife, he was immediately accepted at every college he applied to join. He chose a course at the Falmouth College of Art in Cornwall specialising in technical illustration and paintings of machines and vehicles for industry. It was perfect for Nick, and he was to become one of the star pupils. One of the lecturers commented at the time: "Every college needs someone with a talent like Nick to raise the standards sky high; he carried all the other students along with him, and created an effect which will last for years to come." Two weeks after leaving art college Nick blew every penny he had on a trip to South Africa to ride the great steam trains across the desert, sketching them at every opportunity. Returning to England, in best traditions of all young artists, he struggled to make a living. Paintings by an unknown artist didn't fetch much despite the painstaking effort and time Nick put into each work, so when the college he had recently left offered him a job as a lecturer, he jumped at the chance. The money was good and he discovered that he really enjoyed teaching.

Throughout the 1970s Nick was much involved with a railway preservation society near Plymouth and it was through the railway society that he had his first pictures reproduced as prints. But Nick felt he needed to advance his career and in summer 1985 Nick moved away from Cornwall to join an energetic new design studio in Wiltshire. Here he painted detailed artwork for many major companies including Rolls Royce, General Motors, Volvo Trucks, Alfa Romeo and, to his delight, the aviation and defence industries. He remembers the job as exciting though stressful, often requiring him to work right through the night to meet a client's deadline. Here he learned to be disciplined and fast.Towards the end of the 1980's Nick had the chance to work for the Military Gallery. This was the break that for years he had been striving towards and with typical enthusiasm, flung himself into his new role. After completing a series of aviation posters, including a gigantic painting to commemorate the seventy-fifth anniversary of the Royal Air Force, Nick's first aviation scene to be published as a limited edition was launched by the Military Gallery in 1991. Despite the fact he was unknown in the field, it was an immediate success.

 



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