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Nicolas Trudgian Prints . com

All of the superb range of aviation and naval art prints by renowned artist Nicolas Trudgian, in one easy to navigate gallery.  Listing all prints from the RAF, Luftwaffe, United States Air Force and more - all of Nicolas Trudgians prints in one place.  Nicolas Trudgian Prints . com show all available aviation and naval prints published over the years by the Military Gallery, available from Cranston Fine Arts, the Military and Aviation Art Print Company.

 

 


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Aviation Print Packs
Discount B-17 Flying Fortress Aviation Prints by Nicolas Trudgian and Graeme Lothian.
Return to Rattlesden by Nicolas Trudgian.

Return to Rattlesden by Nicolas Trudgian.
Defenders of the Reich by Graeme Lothian.

Defenders of the Reich by Graeme Lothian.
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Pack 1001. Pack of two Normandy aviation prints by Nicolas Trudgian and Graeme Lothian.
Back from Normandy by Nicolas Trudgian.

Back from Normandy by Nicolas Trudgian.
Ranger by Graeme Lothian.

Ranger by Graeme Lothian.
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Pack 569. Pack of two American B29 Flying Fortress prints by Philip West and Nicolas Trudgian.
The Memphis Belle by Philip West.
The Memphis Belle by Philip West.
First Strike on Berlin by Nicolas Trudgian.

First Strike on Berlin by Nicolas Trudgian.
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JG3 Me109 Aviation Art Prints by Gerald Coulson and Nicolas Trudgian.
Morning Chorus by Gerald Coulson.

Morning Chorus by Gerald Coulson.
Dragons of Colombert by Nicolas Trudgian

Dragons of Colombert by Nicolas Trudgian
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Pack 645. Pack of two D-Day Spitfire prints by Nicolas Trudgian and Geoff Lea.
Victory Over Gold by Nicolas Trudgian. (D)

Victory Over Gold by Nicolas Trudgian. (D)
Normandy Beach Head Patrol by Geoff Lea.

Normandy Beach Head Patrol by Geoff Lea.
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 Nobody, least of all Allied aircrew, ever doubted the tenacity of the Luftwaffe, more particularly that of the German fighter pilots. From the early encounters during the Battle of Britain to the greeat air battles in defence of their homeland late in the war, at all times they were held in high regard, even if resented as a foe. At no time was their dedication, determination, and courage better demonstrated than during the final stages of World War Two. By the summer of 1944 the Allies had gained a foothold in Normandy, and total air superiority above northern France. German installations and ground positions were being pounded daily from the air, and the Ruhr, the heartland of industrial Germany, was under constant siege. Even the factories in southern Germany were not safe from the attentions of the USAAF bombers by day, and the RAF by night. But in spite of the pressures of mounting losses and diminished supplies, the Luftwaffe fought doggedly on in best traditions of the fighter pilot. The morning of 19th July 1944 saw the USAAFs 8th and 15th Air Forces mount an attack of awesome proportion against the aircraft factories in the region of Munich. To combat a seemingly overwhelming force of 1400 bombers and almost as many fighter escorts, the Luftwaffe were able to put up just three Gruppen from JG300 and one from JG302, flying a mix of Me109Gs and Fw190s - barely 50 serviceable fighters between them. They were joined by a dozen Me109s of II./JG27, these fighters desperately trying to defend the very factories in which they were made.

Messerschmitt Country by Nicolas Trudgian (Y)
Was : £150
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Hannes Trautloft in his FW190 leading his famous JG54 bring down a Russian Petlyakov Pe-2 on the Eastern Front in 1943. This dramatic painting is set in a superb winter landscape.
Winter Combat by Nicolas Trudgian.
Was : £290
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P-38 Lightnings launching a surprise attack on a German freight train as it winds its way through the hills of Northern France towards the battle front, shortly before D-Day, 1944.

Lightning Encounter by Nicolas Trudgian. (AP)
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Herbert Ihlefelds personal He162 White 23 - the revolutionary Heinkel Peoples Fighter - on patrol with JG1.This aircraft was captured intact and is today preserved in the National Air & Space Museum in Washington DC. <br><br><b>Published 2000.</b>

Jet Interceptor by Nicolas Trudgian. (C)
Was : £180
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FEATURED SIGNATURE



Wng Cmdr Ken Mackenzie

Ken Mackenzie flew 2 ops on Hurricanes with No.43 Sqn before joining No.501 Sqn based at Kenley during the Battle of Britain, again on Hurricanes. During his time with No.501 Sqn, he claimed 7 victories, with a further 4 shared and 3 damaged. In the most remarkable of these, Ken was following what he thought was a damaged Me109 down to sea level. Realising the aircraft was not damaged, he deliberately struck the tailplane of the enemy aircraft with the wing of his Hurricane (V6799), forcing his opponent to crash. He was subsequently awarded the DFC on 25th October 1940. After this, he joined No.247 Sqn flying night fighter Hurricanes shooting down 10 aircraft in one year. He was shot down on the 29th of September 1941 after claiming an He111 bomber in a night attack planned to target Lannion airfield in Brittany. Ken was engaged by heavy flak from ground defences and completed this sortie by ditching in the sea. He paddled to shore in his dinghy and was subsequently captured and taken prisoner. Ken MacKenzie was posted to various camps before ending up in Stalag Luft 111, Sagan, and was finally repatriated to the UK in October 1944. He was posted to 53 OTU, Kirton-In-Lindsey on 19th December 1945 as an instructor and on 17th June 1945, posted to 61 OTU, Keevil, as a Flight Commander. After the war on the 1st January 1953, Ken was awarded the Air Force Cross. Retired from the RAF on 1st July 1967 with the rank of Wing Commander. Sadly, Wing Commander Ken Mackenzie died on 4th June 2009

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Featured Aircraft

Me110

The Bf-110 grew out of Herman Gorings specifications for a multipurpose aircraft capable of penetrating deep into enemy airspace to clear the sky of enemy fighters in advance of German bomber formations. The aircraft would also be utilized as a long range interceptor, and as a ground support and ground attack bomber. The Bf-110 prototype first flew in 1936. The prototype was under powered with its Daimier Benz DB 600A engines. Several months passed before a go ahead was given for large scale production which commenced in 1938. Utilizing improved DB 601 engines, the early production 110s were as fast as any single engine fighter at that time, and had superior fire power. Their biggest apparent weakness was in the areas of armor protection for the crew, and in terms of maneuverability when compared to single seat fighters. The 110 was produced in large numbers and in many different variants. The 110D was the long range model. An additional belly tank was fitted to that aircraft, with several later variants having the more traditional drop tanks. The first serious test for the Bf-110 came during the Battle of Britain. About 300 Bf-110s were involved. They became easy prey for Hurricane and Spitfire pilots, and Bf-109s were often required to assist the 110s in their own defense. On August 15, 1940, which became known as Black Tuesday, the Bf-110s were ravaged by the RAF, and for the month over 100 aircraft were lost. On the Eastern Front the Bf-110 performed admirably in the early stages of Operation Barbarossa. With the Soviet Air Force weakened in the first several weeks of the attack, 110s were effectively utilized in a ground attack role. Ultimately, the Luftwaffe re-equipped a significant number of its 110s as night fighters. The aircraft performed well in this role because it was a good gun platform with sufficient speed to overtake the RAF night bombers. Such night missions were typically carried out with no Allied fighter escort, so the 110 night fighters would not have to engage or elude Allied fighters in this role.

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 Continuing his popular series of Giclée Studio Proofs on canvas, Robert Taylor portrays Squadron Leader 'Sailor' Malan DFC, Commanding Officer of 74 Squadron and one of the great Battle of Britain Aces, in his famous painting Height of the Battle.  Having already made one diving attack into the force of Luftwaffe He111 bombers approaching London with their fighter escort, 'Sailor' peels his Spitfire over for a second attack. Another top Ace, Pilot Officer Harbourne Stephen DFC, is hard on his heels. Below them, typifying the scene as it was on the afternoon of Wednesday 11 September 1940, Mk.I Hurricanes from 17 and 56 Squadrons have already joined the fray.
Height of the Battle by Robert Taylor. (GS)
 The latest Giclée technology has once again brought Robert Taylor's sophisticated artistry to life to faithfully replicate his classic painting of the Hurricanes of 1 Squadron (RCAF).  Becoming operational at Northolt in August 1940 they served with great distinction throughout the Battle of Britain.
Maple Leaf Scramble by Robert Taylor. (GS)
 Few flew the Hurricane better in combat than Squadron Leader John Grandy, Commanding Officer of 249 Squadron. Robert Taylor's iconic painting Hurricane Attack portrays him about to pounce on a Bf110 over the Isle of Wight in August 1940.
Hurricane Attack by Robert Taylor. (GS)
 By any military standards, it is difficult to imagine the Supreme Commander of the largest air force of the day, piloting himself over the battlefront during the early moments of one of historys greatest military operations. But General Jimmy Doollittle was no ordinary commander. Already awarded Americas highest decoration for valour, General Doolittle was, by the summer of 1944, in command of the American 8th Air Force. On the morning of 6 June, D-Day, he dispatched 1350 bombers together with his entire fighter force to attack enemy ground installations near the beachheads. Sitting around waiting for intelligence reports was not Jimmy Doolittles style. He was going to see for himself what was happening! With Pat Partridge as wingman, they took off flying P-38 Lightnings - chosen for their distinctive profile in the hopes they would deter friendly fire - and climbed above the overcast. Having observed the 8th Air Forces operations at first hand, as they turned for home, Doolittle spotted a hole in the clouds, flick-rolled through it and disappeared beneath the cloud layer. Pat Partridge had his head in the cockpit, probably changing his gas tanks, and when he looked up there was no sign of his Supreme Commander, he circled around for a while, then headed for home. Beneath the clouds Doolittle saw - the most impressive and unforgettable sight I could have possibly imagined - . As some 5000 ships of all shapes and sizes landed 176,000 troops on the enemy held beaches of Northern France, Doolittle flew up and down the battlefront assessing how the invasion was progressing, and after a two and a half hour sortie, headed back to base. After landing, Doolittle hurried over to General Eisenhowers headquarters to provide the first report Eisenhower received, beating his own intelligence information by several hours.
Doolittles D-Day, 6th June 1944 by Robert Taylor. (GS)
It began in pitch darkness. June 6, 1944 was only a few minutes old when the Airborne Pathfinders drifted silently down from the sky above the fields of Normandy. At first their seemed nothing untoward about the drone of aircraft in the night sky. The German garrisons in Northern France were used to the noise of aircraft overhead after dark, but this night seemed particularly busy. Looking skyward a German sentry caught sight of parachutes floating down, clearly visible as the moon fleetingly broke through the clouds. For an instant he thought it was the crew jumping from a damaged bomber, but when he saw the mass of canopies floating earthwards, he knew it was no ordinary event. Within moments of raising the alarm the crackle of automatic gunfire confirmed his worst fears: The Invasion of France had begun. The first assault upon Hitlers Fortress Europe came from the sky. Shortly after midnight waves of aircraft and gliders delivered three Divisions of elite airborne troops into Normandy, their crucial objectives to seize vital bridges, secure strategic positions and clear the way for the coming aerial armada. As the first streaks of dawn came over the horizon on that historic day, and with American and British paratroops already engaged in furious fire fights, the mighty amphibious armada began landing on the beaches of Normandy. Above them waves of troop-carrying aircraft towing gliders stretched from the coast of France all the way back to England. Closely escorted by fighters, they delivered over 20,000 highly trained men into the battlefield of Northern France. By nightfall the first phase of the greatest military invasion in history was complete. Five Divisions were were ashore and the Allies had established a toehold in occupied Europe. For the Third Reich it was the beginning of the end. Without the advanced airborne assault, and the air supremacy achieved by the escort fighters, the amphibious landings could have been a disaster. Seen crossing the Normandy beaches are C-47 Dakotas of the 438th Troop Carrier Group towing CG-4 Waco gliders, closely escorted by P-51Bs of the 354 Fighter Group. Below, landing craft swarm ashore putting men and equipment on the beaches, and everything about this spectacular painting brings alive the events of that historic day a half a century ago.
D-Day The Airborne Assault by Robert Taylor. (GS)
The Battle of the Atlantic was fought by the Royal Navy and RAF Coastal Command against the U-boats. It was a long, deadly struggle in which Hitler’s prized U-boat fleet attempted to starve Britain of food, fuel and the materials of war by destroying the convoys that kept it supplied. The effective use of depth charges by Allied aircraft demanded an attack from extremely low level, but as each submarine was armed with 10 cannons, the dangers to the aircrews was immense.
Caught on the Surface by Robert Taylor. (GS)
 On Saturday, 9 August 1941 the unthinkable happened: the legendary Fighter leader Douglas Bader failed to return from a mission over northern France.  Immediately, without thought for their own safety, the fiercely loyal pilots of his Tangmere Wing set out on a sweep to search for him, hoping that he may have successfully baled out into the Channel. By nightfall, however, there was no sign of him and everyone feared that their famous Wing Leader might have been lost.  A few days later, however, the good news filtered into Tangmere; Bader, renowned as the Fighter Ace with artificial legs, had survived, albeit as a prisoner of war.
Bader Bus Company by Robert Taylor. (GS)
 A Schwarm of Bf109s from JG-52 are about to peel away and, with the battle-cry <i>Horrido!</i> ringing in their ears, dive to attack the flight of enemy aircraft spotted below.  JG-52: the name alone brought terror into the hearts of the Red Air Force pilots.  By the end of the war the Luftwaffe's most successful Geschwader had claimed over 10,000 victories, and from within its ranks emerged the top three scoring Aces in the history of air combat; Gerhard Barkhorn, Gunther Rall and, of course, the highest scorer of them all – Erich Hartmann.
JG52 by Robert Taylor. (GS)

Signatures

Some popular pilot and aircrew signatures from our database of over 2,000 signatures!

Erich Rudorffer

Raymond Grayston

Bud Anderson

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Alfa-Strike by Nicolas Trudgian. (Y)

Alfa-Strike by Nicolas Trudgian. (Y)
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Trainbusters by Nicolas Trudgian. (Y)

Trainbusters by Nicolas Trudgian. (Y)
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Storm Chasers by Nicolas Trudgian. (Y)

Storm Chasers by Nicolas Trudgian. (Y)
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Ace of Diamonds by Nicolas Trudgian (Y)

Ace of Diamonds by Nicolas Trudgian (Y)
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Timber Wolf by Nicolas Trudgian.

Timber Wolf by Nicolas Trudgian.
Price : £110.00
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Having graduated from art college, Nicolas Trudgian spent many years as a professional illustrator before turning to a career in fine art painting. His crisp style of realism, attention to detail, compositional skills and bright use of colours, immediately found favour with collectors and demand for his original work soared on both sides of the Atlantic. Today, more than a decade after becoming a fine art painter, Nicolas Trudgian is firmly established within a tiny, elite group of aviation artists whose works are genuinely collected world-wide.  When he paints an aircraft you can be sure he has researched it in every detail and when he puts it over a particular airfield, the chances are he has paid it a recent visit. Even when he paints a sunset over a tropical island, or mist hanging over a valley in China, most probably he has seen it with his own eyes.

Nick was born and raised in the seafaring city of Plymouth, the port from which the Pilgrim Fathers set sail in 1620, and where Sir Francis Drake played bowls while awaiting the Spanish Armada. Growing up in a house close to the railway station within a busy military city, the harbour always teeming with naval vessels and the skies above resonating with the sounds of naval aircraft, it was not at all surprising the young Nick became fascinated with trains, boats and aircraft. It was from his father, himself a talented artist, that Nick acquired his love of drawing and surrounded by so much that was inspiring, there was never a shortage of ideas for pictures. His talent began to show at an early age and although he did well enough at school, he always spent a disproportionate amount of time drawing. People talked about him becoming a Naval officer or an architect but in 1975 Nick's mind was made up. When he told his careers teacher he wanted to go to art school the man said, 'Now come on, what do you really want to do?"

After leaving school Nick began a one-year foundation course at the Plymouth College of Art. Now armed with an impressive portfolio containing paintings of jet aircraft, trains, even wildlife, he was immediately accepted at every college he applied to join. He chose a course at the Falmouth College of Art in Cornwall specialising in technical illustration and paintings of machines and vehicles for industry. It was perfect for Nick, and he was to become one of the star pupils. One of the lecturers commented at the time: "Every college needs someone with a talent like Nick to raise the standards sky high; he carried all the other students along with him, and created an effect which will last for years to come." Two weeks after leaving art college Nick blew every penny he had on a trip to South Africa to ride the great steam trains across the desert, sketching them at every opportunity. Returning to England, in best traditions of all young artists, he struggled to make a living. Paintings by an unknown artist didn't fetch much despite the painstaking effort and time Nick put into each work, so when the college he had recently left offered him a job as a lecturer, he jumped at the chance. The money was good and he discovered that he really enjoyed teaching.

Throughout the 1970s Nick was much involved with a railway preservation society near Plymouth and it was through the railway society that he had his first pictures reproduced as prints. But Nick felt he needed to advance his career and in summer 1985 Nick moved away from Cornwall to join an energetic new design studio in Wiltshire. Here he painted detailed artwork for many major companies including Rolls Royce, General Motors, Volvo Trucks, Alfa Romeo and, to his delight, the aviation and defence industries. He remembers the job as exciting though stressful, often requiring him to work right through the night to meet a client's deadline. Here he learned to be disciplined and fast.Towards the end of the 1980's Nick had the chance to work for the Military Gallery. This was the break that for years he had been striving towards and with typical enthusiasm, flung himself into his new role. After completing a series of aviation posters, including a gigantic painting to commemorate the seventy-fifth anniversary of the Royal Air Force, Nick's first aviation scene to be published as a limited edition was launched by the Military Gallery in 1991. Despite the fact he was unknown in the field, it was an immediate success.

 

 



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