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CLICK HERE FOR A FULL LIST OF ALL NICOLAS TRUDGIAN PRINTS BY TITLE

Nicolas Trudgian Prints . com

All of the superb range of aviation and naval art prints by renowned artist Nicolas Trudgian, in one easy to navigate gallery.  Listing all prints from the RAF, Luftwaffe, United States Air Force and more - all of Nicolas Trudgians prints in one place.  Nicolas Trudgian Prints . com show all available aviation and naval prints published over the years by the Military Gallery, available from Cranston Fine Arts, the Military and Aviation Art Print Company.

 

 


Buy with confidence and security!
Publishing historical art since 1985

 

Aviation Print Packs
Pack 1259. Two Luftwaffe JG2 Prints by Graeme Lothian and Nicolas Trudgian.
The Battle for the Skies Over Dieppe, 19th August 1942 by Graeme Lothian. (D)

The Battle for the Skies Over Dieppe, 19th August 1942 by Graeme Lothian. (D)
Stormclouds Gather by Nicolas Trudgian. (B)

Stormclouds Gather by Nicolas Trudgian. (B)
Save £205!
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Pack 669. Pack of two Falaise Typhoon prints by Robert Taylor and Nicolas Trudgian.
Closing the Gap by Robert Taylor. (B)

Closing the Gap by Robert Taylor. (B)
Typhoons at Falaise by Nicolas Trudgian. (B)

Typhoons at Falaise by Nicolas Trudgian. (B)
Save £210!
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617 Sqn Lancaster Print Pack by Nicolas Trudgian and Gerald Coulson.
Sinking the Tirpitz by Nicolas Trudgian.

Sinking the Tirpitz by Nicolas Trudgian.
Summer Harvest by Gerald Coulson.

Summer Harvest by Gerald Coulson.
Save £360!
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P-38 Lockheed Lightning Aviation Prints by Philip West and Nicolas Trudgian.
Winter of 44 by Philip West.

Winter of 44 by Philip West.
Lightning Encounter by Nicolas Trudgian.

Lightning Encounter by Nicolas Trudgian.
Save £110!
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Pack 1251. Two Typhoon Aviation Prints by Stephen Brown and Nicolas Trudgian.
Typhoon Scramble by Stephen Brown.
Typhoon Scramble by Stephen Brown.
Typhoons Over the Rhine by Nicolas Trudgian.

Typhoons Over the Rhine by Nicolas Trudgian.
Save £155!
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Hannes Trautloft in his FW190 leading his famous JG54 bring down a Russian Petlyakov Pe-2 on the Eastern Front in 1943. This dramatic painting is set in a superb winter landscape.
Winter Combat by Nicolas Trudgian.
Was : £290
Now £240.00!
 Messerschmitt Me262s of JG7 race back to their base at Brandenburg after intercepting a USAAF bomber raid on Munich, and Luftwaffe air bases in the area. Below them a B-26 has crash-landed in the fields still covered with a sprinkling of late winter snow. In the distance the afternoon sun glistens on the Bavarian Alpine mountains.

Return of the Hunters by Nicolas Trudgian.
Was : £480
Now £430.00!
  It is January 1945, and its cold. The German advance in the Ardennes is nearly over, but the Panzer Army is desperately throwing more troops into the breach who try to keep their momentum going in The Battle of the Bulge. Tasked with preventing German reinforcements from reaching the battle front, the Ninth Air Force launched a series of low-level attacks on enemy ground forces as they wind their way through the Ardennes. Flying conditions were not easy, cloud bases were low, and snow was in the air. Nicolas Trudgians new painting recreates an attack on January 23, 1945, by Douglas A-20 Havocs of the 410th Bomb Group. Locating an enemy convoy in open space near the German town of Blankenheim, the Havoc pilots make a swift attack diving from 8000 feet, catching the German force by surprise: Hurtling down the line of vehicles at 320mph they release their parafrag bombs from 300 feet then, dropping just above the roofs of the army trucks continue down the column blasting everything in sight with their forward-firing .50mm caliber machine guns. In the space of a few minutes the attack is completed and the convoy decimated.  With ammunition expended and fuel running low the A-20 Havocs climb out of the zone and head for base in France. A 20mm shell has hit the lead aircraft wounding the Bombardier/Navigator Gordon Jones, which will seriously hamper their return through a blizzard, but all aircraft make it safely home - the lead aircraft, on landing, counting over 100 holes of various sizes. For their part in leading the successful attack the Lead Pilot Russell Fellers and Bombardier/Navigator Gordon G. Jones received the Silver Star. <br><br><b>Published 2001.<br><br>Signed by A-20 Havoc combat aircrews, including two Silver Star recipients, from World War Two.</b>

Raising Havoc in the Ardennes by Nicolas Trudgian. (B)
Was : £300
Now £250.00!
Returning from a dogfight raid over Germany, B-24s of 93rd Bomb Group fly low over an East Anglian fishing village on Britains east coast.
Safe Haven by Nicolas Trudgian.
Was : £200
Now £150.00!

FEATURED SIGNATURE



Private 1st Class Arthur Art Petersen

Serving with Fox Company, 506th PIR, 101st Airborne he was one of many paratroopers misdropped on D-Day. Landing near Sainte Mère-Église he briefly fought alongside Easy Company before heading south into the bitter fire-fight raging around the church at Angoville-au-Plain. After being wounded he was briefly treated in the Church and then fought in the advance into Carentan. He later jumped on Operation Market Garden, where he was wounded, but was back in action in time to re-join his unit in the Battle of the Bulge. Wounded yet again, Bastogne proved to be his final combat.

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Other Aviation Artists

 

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 With his personal emblem of black and white fuselage band adorning his Fokker E.V, 153/18, Richard Wenzl briefly commanded Jasta 6, based at Bernes in August 1918, and claimed a modest 6 victories during his career with JG 1. The Fokker E.V was both fast and manoeuvrable, but a series of engine and structural failures meant that these exciting new machines saw only brief service before being re-worked to emerge as the D.VIII, sadly too late to make any impression on the war. Wenzl is shown here in combat with Sopwith Camels of 203 Sqn, assisted by Fokker D.VIIs, which served alongside the E.Vs of Jasta 6. The D.VII shown is that of Ltn d R Erich Just of Jasta 11, also based at Bernes.

Leutnant d R Richard Wenzl by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
 Aircraft of Jasta 10 prepare to taxi out for a dawn patrol, led by the fearless Leutnant Werner Voss in his Fokker F1 103/17 in September 1917. Arguments still rage concerning the colour of the engine cowling on his Triplane. Certainly, when the aircraft was delivered, its upper surfaces were painted factory finish streaked green and, it is recorded that it was flown as delivered with Voss personal mechanic noting that no extra painting was undertaken, aside from Voss Japanese kite face which occupied the nose.  However, research shows that by the time of Voss death on 23rd September 1917, after his epic battle with SE5s of 56 Sqn, the cowling was probably yellow in keeping with all Jasta 10 aircraft. Renowned by pilots from both sides for his bravery and extraordinary abilities with his diminutive Triplane, the young ace scored a total of 48 confirmed victories before being brought down by Lieutenant Rhys Davids on the very day that he was due to go on leave.  The Fokker F1 differed from the production DR.1 in detail only, Voss machine being fitted with a captured 110hp Le Rhone engine, his aircraft not being fitted with the outer wing skids common to the DR.1.

Leutnant Werner Voss by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
 Germanys greatest exponent of the Fokker Dr1 Triplane, Leutnant Josef Jacobs is depicted chatting with colleagues of Jasta 7 before a sortie in the spring of 1918.  His black Triplane became well known to allied pilots, not least because of his formidable kill rate.  By the end of the war, still aged just 24, Jacobs had claimed 48 enemy aircraft destroyed.  The unusual practice of applying the black cross to the upper sides of the lower wings was to counter friendly fire from other German aircraft who frequently mistook the Dr1 for a Sopwith Triplane.

Leutnant Josef Jacobs by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
Albatros DIII of Godwin Brumowski about to shoot down a Caquot balloon.

Oberleutnant Godwin Brumowski by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
Synonymous with both World Wars, the young Hermann Goring scored his first victory on 16th November 1915, shooting down a Maurice Farman over Tahure. A year later, he was injured in combat, but managed to land his bullet-riddled aircraft near a field hospital. Goring steadily increased his score to an eventual 22 victories and is shown here on patrol in his characteristic all-white Fokker D.VII.

Oberleutnant Hermann Goring by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
Wearing one of the most distinctive colour schemes of World War One, Germanys second highest scoring ace after Manfred Von Richthofen was the charismatic Ernst Udet with 62 victories to his credit.  His brightly coloured Fokker D.VII carried the initials of his girlfriend (LO) on the side of his aircraft and the inscription Du Noch Nicht! (Not You Yet!) on the upper tail surfaces.  Udet was badly wounded in September 1918 and did not fly in combat again, but survived the war, only to commit suicide in 1941.

Oberleutnant Ernst Udet by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
  Max Immelmanns Fokker E.1(E13/15) shooting down a Vickers Gunbus during the Summer of 1915. Immelmann is characteristically already scouring the sky above for his next victim.

Max Immelmann by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
A German Albatross D-III sees off a Bristol Fighter among the clouds over the Western Front, early in 1917. The D-III was a massive improvement over the monoplanes of the time, possessing greater manoeuvrability, a higher ceiling and synchronized guns. Many German aces thought this the best fighter of the First World War.

One in the Bag by Ivan Berryman. (PC)

Signatures

Some popular pilot and aircrew signatures from our database of over 2,000 signatures!

Erich Rudorffer

Raymond Grayston

Bud Anderson

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Stormclouds Gather by Nicolas Trudgian (Y)

Stormclouds Gather by Nicolas Trudgian (Y)
Price : £100.00
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Into The Cloak of Darkness by Nicolas Trudgian

Into The Cloak of Darkness by Nicolas Trudgian
Price : £125.00
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Moonlight Hunter by Nicolas Trudgian.

Moonlight Hunter by Nicolas Trudgian.
Price : £95.00
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Desert Victory by Nicolas Trudgian.

Desert Victory by Nicolas Trudgian.
Price : £130.00
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One - Tens Over Kent by Nicolas Trudgian

One - Tens Over Kent by Nicolas Trudgian
Price : £140.00
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Having graduated from art college, Nicolas Trudgian spent many years as a professional illustrator before turning to a career in fine art painting. His crisp style of realism, attention to detail, compositional skills and bright use of colours, immediately found favour with collectors and demand for his original work soared on both sides of the Atlantic. Today, more than a decade after becoming a fine art painter, Nicolas Trudgian is firmly established within a tiny, elite group of aviation artists whose works are genuinely collected world-wide.  When he paints an aircraft you can be sure he has researched it in every detail and when he puts it over a particular airfield, the chances are he has paid it a recent visit. Even when he paints a sunset over a tropical island, or mist hanging over a valley in China, most probably he has seen it with his own eyes.

Nick was born and raised in the seafaring city of Plymouth, the port from which the Pilgrim Fathers set sail in 1620, and where Sir Francis Drake played bowls while awaiting the Spanish Armada. Growing up in a house close to the railway station within a busy military city, the harbour always teeming with naval vessels and the skies above resonating with the sounds of naval aircraft, it was not at all surprising the young Nick became fascinated with trains, boats and aircraft. It was from his father, himself a talented artist, that Nick acquired his love of drawing and surrounded by so much that was inspiring, there was never a shortage of ideas for pictures. His talent began to show at an early age and although he did well enough at school, he always spent a disproportionate amount of time drawing. People talked about him becoming a Naval officer or an architect but in 1975 Nick's mind was made up. When he told his careers teacher he wanted to go to art school the man said, 'Now come on, what do you really want to do?"

After leaving school Nick began a one-year foundation course at the Plymouth College of Art. Now armed with an impressive portfolio containing paintings of jet aircraft, trains, even wildlife, he was immediately accepted at every college he applied to join. He chose a course at the Falmouth College of Art in Cornwall specialising in technical illustration and paintings of machines and vehicles for industry. It was perfect for Nick, and he was to become one of the star pupils. One of the lecturers commented at the time: "Every college needs someone with a talent like Nick to raise the standards sky high; he carried all the other students along with him, and created an effect which will last for years to come." Two weeks after leaving art college Nick blew every penny he had on a trip to South Africa to ride the great steam trains across the desert, sketching them at every opportunity. Returning to England, in best traditions of all young artists, he struggled to make a living. Paintings by an unknown artist didn't fetch much despite the painstaking effort and time Nick put into each work, so when the college he had recently left offered him a job as a lecturer, he jumped at the chance. The money was good and he discovered that he really enjoyed teaching.

Throughout the 1970s Nick was much involved with a railway preservation society near Plymouth and it was through the railway society that he had his first pictures reproduced as prints. But Nick felt he needed to advance his career and in summer 1985 Nick moved away from Cornwall to join an energetic new design studio in Wiltshire. Here he painted detailed artwork for many major companies including Rolls Royce, General Motors, Volvo Trucks, Alfa Romeo and, to his delight, the aviation and defence industries. He remembers the job as exciting though stressful, often requiring him to work right through the night to meet a client's deadline. Here he learned to be disciplined and fast.Towards the end of the 1980's Nick had the chance to work for the Military Gallery. This was the break that for years he had been striving towards and with typical enthusiasm, flung himself into his new role. After completing a series of aviation posters, including a gigantic painting to commemorate the seventy-fifth anniversary of the Royal Air Force, Nick's first aviation scene to be published as a limited edition was launched by the Military Gallery in 1991. Despite the fact he was unknown in the field, it was an immediate success.

 

 



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