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CLICK HERE FOR A FULL LIST OF ALL NICOLAS TRUDGIAN PRINTS BY TITLE

Nicolas Trudgian Prints . com

All of the superb range of aviation and naval art prints by renowned artist Nicolas Trudgian, in one easy to navigate gallery.  Listing all prints from the RAF, Luftwaffe, United States Air Force and more - all of Nicolas Trudgians prints in one place.  Nicolas Trudgian Prints . com show all available aviation and naval prints published over the years by the Military Gallery, available from Cranston Fine Arts, the Military and Aviation Art Print Company.

 

 


Buy with confidence and security!
Publishing historical art since 1985

 

Aviation Print Packs
Pack 540. Pack of two D-Day Normandy aviation prints by Nicolas Trudgian.
D-Day Armada by Nicolas Trudgian.

D-Day Armada by Nicolas Trudgian.
Returning from Caen by Graeme Lothian.

Returning from Caen by Graeme Lothian.
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Spitfire Pilot Signature Prints by Nicolas Trudgian and Robert Taylor.
Eagle Squadron Scramble by Robert Taylor

Eagle Squadron Scramble by Robert Taylor
First Flap of the Day by Nicolas Trudgian. (E)

First Flap of the Day by Nicolas Trudgian. (E)
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Pack 1257. Two JG2 Luftwaffe Prints by Graeme Lothian and Nicolas Trudgian.
The Battle for the Skies Over Dieppe, 19th August 1942 by Graeme Lothian.

The Battle for the Skies Over Dieppe, 19th August 1942 by Graeme Lothian.
Stormclouds Gather by Nicolas Trudgian

Stormclouds Gather by Nicolas Trudgian
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Pack 785. Pack of two Battle of Britain prints by Anthony Saunders and Nicolas Trudgian.
Homeward Bound by Anthony Saunders. (AP)

Homeward Bound by Anthony Saunders. (AP)
Head to Head by Nicolas Trudgian. (B)

Head to Head by Nicolas Trudgian. (B)
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Lancaster Aviation Print Pack by Nicolas Trudgian and Robert Taylor.
Strike and Return by Robert Taylor.

Strike and Return by Robert Taylor.
Bomber Force by Nicolas Trudgian.

Bomber Force by Nicolas Trudgian.
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Latest Nicolas Trudgian Print Offers : 

DHM2707E. Alpine Scramble by Nicolas Trudgian.

Alpine Scramble by Nicolas Trudgian. (E)
Was : £350
Now £300.00!
 Mickey Mount, flying his 602 Squadron MkII Spitfire, successfully attacks a Messerschmitt Me109 low over the cliffs of Beachy Head on the south coast during the Battle of Britain in the summer of 1940. Spitfires and Me109s were so evenly matched at this early point in the war that the outcome of such contests were usually decided by the skill of the competing pilots.

Combat Over Beachy Head by Nicolas Trudgian. (C)
Was : £230
Now £180.00!
  It is January 1945, and its cold. The German advance in the Ardennes is nearly over, but the Panzer Army is desperately throwing more troops into the breach who try to keep their momentum going in The Battle of the Bulge. Tasked with preventing German reinforcements from reaching the battle front, the Ninth Air Force launched a series of low-level attacks on enemy ground forces as they wind their way through the Ardennes. Flying conditions were not easy, cloud bases were low, and snow was in the air. Nicolas Trudgians new painting recreates an attack on January 23, 1945, by Douglas A-20 Havocs of the 410th Bomb Group. Locating an enemy convoy in open space near the German town of Blankenheim, the Havoc pilots make a swift attack diving from 8000 feet, catching the German force by surprise: Hurtling down the line of vehicles at 320mph they release their parafrag bombs from 300 feet then, dropping just above the roofs of the army trucks continue down the column blasting everything in sight with their forward-firing .50mm caliber machine guns. In the space of a few minutes the attack is completed and the convoy decimated.  With ammunition expended and fuel running low the A-20 Havocs climb out of the zone and head for base in France. A 20mm shell has hit the lead aircraft wounding the Bombardier/Navigator Gordon Jones, which will seriously hamper their return through a blizzard, but all aircraft make it safely home - the lead aircraft, on landing, counting over 100 holes of various sizes. For their part in leading the successful attack the Lead Pilot Russell Fellers and Bombardier/Navigator Gordon G. Jones received the Silver Star. <br><br><b>Published 2001.<br><br>Signed by A-20 Havoc combat aircrews, including two Silver Star recipients, from World War Two.</b>

Raising Havoc in the Ardennes by Nicolas Trudgian. (B)
Was : £300
Now £250.00!
 Spitfires of No. 132 Squadron rush towards the Front to give ground support to the advancing Allied forces following breakout from the Normandy beaches, June 1944. <br><br><b>Published in 2003. <br><br>Signed by eight highly decorated fighter pilots who flew combat missions on D-Day, 6 June 1944, and during the Battle for Normandy.</b>

Normandy Breakout by Nicolas Trudgian (AP)
Was : £290
Now £240.00!

FEATURED SIGNATURE



Private 1st Class Arthur Art Petersen

Serving with Fox Company, 506th PIR, 101st Airborne he was one of many paratroopers misdropped on D-Day. Landing near Sainte Mère-Église he briefly fought alongside Easy Company before heading south into the bitter fire-fight raging around the church at Angoville-au-Plain. After being wounded he was briefly treated in the Church and then fought in the advance into Carentan. He later jumped on Operation Market Garden, where he was wounded, but was back in action in time to re-join his unit in the Battle of the Bulge. Wounded yet again, Bastogne proved to be his final combat.

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Other Aviation Artists

 

All Our Latest Aviation Releases : 

 Schneider CA1 Tanks of the French tenth army spearhead the successful counter offensive against the German army on the river Marne. Overhead a tenacious Junkers JI artillery spotter dogs their tracks. The Second Battle of the Marne, though not an overwhelming victory, spelt the end of German successes on the Western front, and a turning point for the allies.

Tanks on the Marne - France, 18th July 1918 by David Pentland. (PC)
 An SAS team is picked up by a U.S. Army Special Forces Blackhawk helicopter after a successful operation against the Taliban.

Extraction - Afghanistan 2011 by David Pentland. (PC)
The Luftwaffe had done everything in its power to pummel London into submission but they failed. By the end of September 1940 their losses were mounting. For weeks since the early days of September, London had been the main target for the Luftwaffe and during that time Luftwaffe High Command had grown increasingly despondent as their losses steadily mounted. Far from being on the brink of collapse RAF Fighter Command, though vastly outnumbered, had shown an incredible resilience. The fighting had reached a dramatic climax on Sunday 15th September when, bloodied and bruised, the Luftwaffe had lost the upper hand on a day of intense combat that had culminated with a humiliating retreat. Almost every day that had passed since then had seen the Luftwaffe do everything in its power to pummel London and regain the initiative, but the daylight raids were becoming increasingly costly. On Friday 27th September, 80 days after the Battle of Britain had officially begun, the Luftwaffe came once more, this time concentrating on the fastest bombers they had - Ju88s and Bf110s. And they came in force, principally targeting London and Bristol. Anthony Saunders' superb painting depicts one of these raids, this time by bombers from KG77 as they head over the Medway Estuary, east of the City of London, in an attempt to attack the capital's warehouses and docks. Among the many units defending the capital that day was 92 Squadron from Biggin Hill and Anthony portrays the Spitfire of Pilot Officer Geoffrey Wellum in his dramatic piece. With a deft flick of the rudder Wellum banks his fighter away to port seconds after sharing in the destruction of a Ju88. It was just one of more than 50 German aircraft destroyed by the RAF during the day.
Decisive Blow by Anthony Saunders.
 Despite having sight in just one eye, Major Edward Mick Mannock was to become one of the most decorated and celebrated aces of World War 1, bringing down an official 61 enemy aircraft in just eighteen months before himself being brought down in flames by enemy ground fire. He was reluctant to add shared kills to his tally, so his actual total of victories is recorded at 73. His decorations include the VC, DSO and 2 Bars, MC and Bar and he is depicted here diving on enemy aircraft in SE5a D278 of 74 Sqn in April, 1918.

Major Edward Mannock by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
 Mystery still surrounds just why Manfred von Richthofen risked so much in chasing the novice pilot Wilfred Wop May into Allied-occupied territory on the morning of Sunday, 21st April 1918, but it was to be his last flight, this error of judgement costing him his life. Von Richthofen had broken from the main fight involving Sopwith Camels of 209 Sqn to chase Mays aircraft, but found himself under attack from the Camel of Captain Roy Brown. All three aircraft turned and weaved low along the Somme River, the all red Triplane coming under intense fire from the ground as well as from Browns aircraft. No one knows exactly who fired the crucial bullet, but Manfred von Richthofens aircraft was seen to dive suddenly and impact with the ground. The Red Baron was dead and his amazing run of 80 victories was over. The painting shows Mays aircraft (D3326) in the extreme distance, pursued by DR.1 (425/17) and Browns Camel (B7270) in the foreground.

Captain Roy Brown engages the Red Baron, 21st April 1918 by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
 With a final 47 victories to his credit, Robert Alexander Little was one of the highest-scoring British aces of World War 1, beginning his career with the famous No 8 (Naval) Squadron in 1916, flying Sopwith Pup N5182, as shown here. On 21st April 1917, he was attacked and shot down by six aircraft of Jasta Boelke, Little being thrown from the cockpit of his Sopwith Camel on impact with the ground. As the German aircraft swooped in to rake the wreckage with machine gun fire, Little pulled his Webley from its holster and began returning fire before being assisted by British infantry with their Lewis guns. Such was the character of this great pilot who finally met his death whilst attacking Gotha bombers on the night of 27th May 1918.

Captain Robert Little by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
 The exploits of the partnership of McKeever and Powell in their 11 Squadron Bristol F.2B made them perhaps the most celebrated of all the Bristol Fighter crews, McKeever himself becoming the highest scoring exponent of this classic type with a closing tally of 31 victories. Powell was to secure a further 19 kills before both were withdrawn from front line service to Home Establishment in January 1918. Whilst on a lone patrol above enemy lines in November 1917, their aircraft (A7288) was attacked by two German two-seaters and seven Albatross scouts, four of which were sent to the ground through a combination of superb airmanship and outstanding gunnery. The remaining German aircraft continued to give chase until the F.2B was down to less than 20ft above the British trenches, at which point the Germans broke off their attack and fled.

Captain Andrew McKeever and 2nd Lieutenant Leslie Powell by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
 The Sopwith Dolphin was a radical departure from previous Sopwith design philosophies, embodying a reverse-stagger on the wings, a water-cooled Hispano-Suiza engine and an unusual, but highly popular positioning of the cockpit which gave the pilot unprecedented views. One exponent of this purposeful looking machine was Canadian Major A D Carter who claimed many of his 31 victories flying the Dolphin. He is shown here sending an Albatross to the ground on 8th May 1918 whilst flying C4017. Carter was himself shot down soon after became a prisoner of war. He was killed in 1919 whilst test flying a Fokker D.VII at Shoreham, Sussex.

Major Albert Carter by Ivan Berryman. (PC)

Signatures

Some popular pilot and aircrew signatures from our database of over 2,000 signatures!

Erich Rudorffer

Raymond Grayston

Bud Anderson

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Alfa-Strike by Nicolas Trudgian. (Y)

Alfa-Strike by Nicolas Trudgian. (Y)
Price : £75.00
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Mosquitos at Dusk by Nicolas Trudgian.

Mosquitos at Dusk by Nicolas Trudgian.
Price : £140.00
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Fighter Legend - Johnnie Johnson by Nicolas Trudgian.

Fighter Legend - Johnnie Johnson by Nicolas Trudgian.
Price : £80.00
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One - Tens Over Kent by Nicolas Trudgian

One - Tens Over Kent by Nicolas Trudgian
Price : £140.00
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September Victory by Nicolas Trudgian. (Y)

September Victory by Nicolas Trudgian. (Y)
Price : £350.00
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Having graduated from art college, Nicolas Trudgian spent many years as a professional illustrator before turning to a career in fine art painting. His crisp style of realism, attention to detail, compositional skills and bright use of colours, immediately found favour with collectors and demand for his original work soared on both sides of the Atlantic. Today, more than a decade after becoming a fine art painter, Nicolas Trudgian is firmly established within a tiny, elite group of aviation artists whose works are genuinely collected world-wide.  When he paints an aircraft you can be sure he has researched it in every detail and when he puts it over a particular airfield, the chances are he has paid it a recent visit. Even when he paints a sunset over a tropical island, or mist hanging over a valley in China, most probably he has seen it with his own eyes.

Nick was born and raised in the seafaring city of Plymouth, the port from which the Pilgrim Fathers set sail in 1620, and where Sir Francis Drake played bowls while awaiting the Spanish Armada. Growing up in a house close to the railway station within a busy military city, the harbour always teeming with naval vessels and the skies above resonating with the sounds of naval aircraft, it was not at all surprising the young Nick became fascinated with trains, boats and aircraft. It was from his father, himself a talented artist, that Nick acquired his love of drawing and surrounded by so much that was inspiring, there was never a shortage of ideas for pictures. His talent began to show at an early age and although he did well enough at school, he always spent a disproportionate amount of time drawing. People talked about him becoming a Naval officer or an architect but in 1975 Nick's mind was made up. When he told his careers teacher he wanted to go to art school the man said, 'Now come on, what do you really want to do?"

After leaving school Nick began a one-year foundation course at the Plymouth College of Art. Now armed with an impressive portfolio containing paintings of jet aircraft, trains, even wildlife, he was immediately accepted at every college he applied to join. He chose a course at the Falmouth College of Art in Cornwall specialising in technical illustration and paintings of machines and vehicles for industry. It was perfect for Nick, and he was to become one of the star pupils. One of the lecturers commented at the time: "Every college needs someone with a talent like Nick to raise the standards sky high; he carried all the other students along with him, and created an effect which will last for years to come." Two weeks after leaving art college Nick blew every penny he had on a trip to South Africa to ride the great steam trains across the desert, sketching them at every opportunity. Returning to England, in best traditions of all young artists, he struggled to make a living. Paintings by an unknown artist didn't fetch much despite the painstaking effort and time Nick put into each work, so when the college he had recently left offered him a job as a lecturer, he jumped at the chance. The money was good and he discovered that he really enjoyed teaching.

Throughout the 1970s Nick was much involved with a railway preservation society near Plymouth and it was through the railway society that he had his first pictures reproduced as prints. But Nick felt he needed to advance his career and in summer 1985 Nick moved away from Cornwall to join an energetic new design studio in Wiltshire. Here he painted detailed artwork for many major companies including Rolls Royce, General Motors, Volvo Trucks, Alfa Romeo and, to his delight, the aviation and defence industries. He remembers the job as exciting though stressful, often requiring him to work right through the night to meet a client's deadline. Here he learned to be disciplined and fast.Towards the end of the 1980's Nick had the chance to work for the Military Gallery. This was the break that for years he had been striving towards and with typical enthusiasm, flung himself into his new role. After completing a series of aviation posters, including a gigantic painting to commemorate the seventy-fifth anniversary of the Royal Air Force, Nick's first aviation scene to be published as a limited edition was launched by the Military Gallery in 1991. Despite the fact he was unknown in the field, it was an immediate success.

 

 



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