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Catalina

Built by the Consolidated Aircraft Company and designed by Isaax M Ladden. the Catalina first flew on the 28th march 1935. and first flew with the US Navy in October 1936. In 1935 the cost of each Catalina was $90,000 and just over 4,000 were built. The Catalina was used in various maritime roles. but it was designed initially as a maritime patrol bomber. Its long range was intended to seek out enemy transport and supply ships. but was eventually used in many roles including Convoy escort,, anti submarine warfare and search and rescue. In its role as a search and rescue aircraft it probably is best remembered for many thousands of aircrews shot down in the Pacific and less extend in the Atlantic and Mediterranean. The Catalina was the most successful flying boat of the war and even served in a military role until the early 1980's some are still used today in aerial firefighting.
Nicolas Trudgian Catalina Aviation Art Prints, Paintings and Drawings
Aviation Art

Flight Out of Hell by Nicolas Trudgian.


Flight Out of Hell by Nicolas Trudgian.

On February 15, 1944, a force of B-24s, B-25s and A-20s hammered the heavily defended Japanese base at Kavieng. Several aircraft, however, were forced to ditch; three downed B-25 crews from 345th Bomb Group floating helplessly in life-rafts within a thousand yards of the beach, and the Japanese troops were in no mood to take prisoners. Their only chance of survival was the air-sea rescue PBY Catalina. Nicolas Trudgians dramatic reconstruction depicts Lt. Commander Nathan Gordons PBY Catalina making its final take-off, the intense enemy gunfire from the shore making his mission seemingly impossible. But the young pilot got all 25 men aboard safely home, and was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor for what is one of the bravest actions of the war in the Pacific.
Item Code : DHM2024Flight Out of Hell by Nicolas Trudgian. - Editions Available
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PRINT Signed limited edition of 600 prints.
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Paper size 33 inches x 24 inches (84cm x 61cm) Cavoli, William J
Brately, John
Lewis, Robert E
Gordon, Nathan
+ Artist : Nicolas Trudgian


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Paper size 33 inches x 24 inches (84cm x 61cm) Cavoli, William J
Brately, John
Lewis, Robert E
Gordon, Nathan
+ Artist : Nicolas Trudgian


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Paper size 33 inches x 24 inches (84cm x 61cm) Cavoli, William J
Brately, John
Lewis, Robert E
Gordon, Nathan
+ Artist : Nicolas Trudgian


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Main Body by Stan Stokes.
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Great Catalina Take-Off by Roy Cross.
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Black Cat Rescue by Nicolas Trudgian.
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Black Cat Rescue by Nicolas Trudgian.


Black Cat Rescue by Nicolas Trudgian.

On February 15, 1944, flying his Navy PBY Catalina on air-sea rescue duty, Lt. Nathan Gordon received an urgent call. Several 345th BG B25s were down following a major attack on Kavieng, and crews were in the water just offshore. Under intense gunfire, Gordon made no fewer than four perilous water landings to pick up survivors, returning to make an emergency landing at Cape Gloucester with 25 people aboard, an just 10 gallons of fuel in his tanks. Gordon was awarded the Medal of Honor.
Item Code : DHM2021Black Cat Rescue by Nicolas Trudgian. - Editions Available
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Paper size 16 inches x 24 inches (41cm x 61cm) Gordon, Nathan
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All Catalina Aviation Art Prints, Paintings and Drawings
Aviation Art
 The Consolidated PBY Catalina, the sea going flying workhorse of the US Navy during WW II, is with no doubt the most successful flying boat ever produced. Produced for more than ten years, it was built in greater numbers (3,300) than any other flyin......Wings Over Waikiki by Stan Stokes.

2 editions with signatures!
The Consolidated PBY Catalina, the sea going flying workhorse of the US Navy during WW II, is with no doubt the most successful flying boat ever produced. Produced for more than ten years, it was built in greater numbers (3,300) than any other flyin......4 print editions available from £35.00
3 canvas print editions available from £294.00
 On February 15, 1944, a force of B-24s, B-25s and A-20s hammered the heavily defended Japanese base at Kavieng. Several aircraft, however, were forced to ditch; three downed B-25 crews from 345th Bomb Group floating helplessly in life-rafts within a......
Flight Out of Hell by Nicolas Trudgian.

2 editions with signatures!
On February 15, 1944, a force of B-24s, B-25s and A-20s hammered the heavily defended Japanese base at Kavieng. Several aircraft, however, were forced to ditch; three downed B-25 crews from 345th Bomb Group floating helplessly in life-rafts within a......2 print editions available from £130.00
 The Consolidated Model 28 PBY Catalina was so successful in its definitive form that it went on to become the most extensively built flying boat of all time. Here, a 210 Squadron Catalina Mk IVA from RAF Sullom Voe, Shetland, has located two weary d......
By Dawns Light by Ivan Berryman.

2 editions with signatures!
The Consolidated Model 28 PBY Catalina was so successful in its definitive form that it went on to become the most extensively built flying boat of all time. Here, a 210 Squadron Catalina Mk IVA from RAF Sullom Voe, Shetland, has located two weary d......2 print editions available from £90.00
SPQ5253.  Great Catalina Take-Off by Roy Cross. ......Great Catalina Take-Off by Roy Cross.SPQ5253. Great Catalina Take-Off by Roy Cross. ......1 print edition available from £50.00
 D for Donald of 270 squadron, Royal Air Force, out of Freetown, West Africa operating in the Atlantic Ocean. It was during routine operation search that D for Donald surprised U515 on the surface and immediately attacked the submarine. U515 in putti......Catalina Attack by John Wynne Hopkins.

4 editions with signatures!
D for Donald of 270 squadron, Royal Air Force, out of Freetown, West Africa operating in the Atlantic Ocean. It was during routine operation search that D for Donald surprised U515 on the surface and immediately attacked the submarine. U515 in putti......5 print editions available from £80.00
Original available : £2700.00
 Jimmy Doolittles attack on Japan with B-25s launched from the USS Hornet was a blow to Japanese morale, and it gave Admiral Yamamoto the leverage he needed to push for a grandiose plan to inflict a decisive military blow to American forces in the Pa......Main Body by Stan Stokes. Jimmy Doolittles attack on Japan with B-25s launched from the USS Hornet was a blow to Japanese morale, and it gave Admiral Yamamoto the leverage he needed to push for a grandiose plan to inflict a decisive military blow to American forces in the Pa......2 print editions available from £35.00
3 canvas print editions available from £294.00
 On February 15, 1944, flying his Navy PBY Catalina on air-sea rescue duty, Lt. Nathan Gordon received an urgent call. Several 345th BG B25s were down following a major attack on Kavieng, and crews were in the water just offshore. Under intense gunfi......Black Cat Rescue by Nicolas Trudgian.

3 editions with signatures!
On February 15, 1944, flying his Navy PBY Catalina on air-sea rescue duty, Lt. Nathan Gordon received an urgent call. Several 345th BG B25s were down following a major attack on Kavieng, and crews were in the water just offshore. Under intense gunfi......2 print editions available from £50.00
1 ex-display print available from £40.00
Royal Air Force catalina over flys a Royal Navy Cruiser of Gibraltar while on patrol.......On the Prowl by Timothy OBrien.Royal Air Force catalina over flys a Royal Navy Cruiser of Gibraltar while on patrol.......1 print edition available from £18.00
RAF Catalinas of 210 Squadron over the West Coast of Scotland in 1944.  The Consolidated Catalina PBY-5 proved invaluable to the RAF in its efforts to defend the vital convoys from the threat of enemy submarines, particularly during the Battle of the......Heading for the Convoys by Stephen Brown.

3 editions with signatures!
RAF Catalinas of 210 Squadron over the West Coast of Scotland in 1944. The Consolidated Catalina PBY-5 proved invaluable to the RAF in its efforts to defend the vital convoys from the threat of enemy submarines, particularly during the Battle of the......2 print editions available from £125.00
All 1 canvas print edition sold out.
 A Catalina flying boat of the Royal Air Force shown at anchor in the Indian Ocean at night. ......
Black Cat, Indian Ocean, 1944 by David Pentland. A Catalina flying boat of the Royal Air Force shown at anchor in the Indian Ocean at night. ......2 print editions available from £90.00
1 canvas print edition available from £370.00
 Flt. Lt. John Alexander Cruickshank in his consolidated Catalina. Winning his Victoria Cross for sinking U-347. ......
Sinking of U-Boat 347 by Tim Fisher. Flt. Lt. John Alexander Cruickshank in his consolidated Catalina. Winning his Victoria Cross for sinking U-347. ......2 print editions available from £22.00
1 canvas print edition available from £370.00
Original available : £1500.00
B0223. Catalina Crescendo by Ivan Berryman. ......
Catalina Crescendo by Ivan Berryman.B0223. Catalina Crescendo by Ivan Berryman. ......1 print edition available from £48.00
Signatures for : Catalina
A list of all signatures from our database who are associated with this aircraft. A profile page is available by clicking their name.
NameInfo

M Belcher
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M Belcher

Catalina pilot of No.259 Sqn based at Mombasa, carrying out patrols over the Indian Ocean



Flt. Lt. John Bishop
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Flt. Lt. John Bishop

Joined the RAF in April 1943 from Edinburgh University Air Squadron and trained as a pilot in Rhodesia. In August 1944 he was posted to Diego Suarez to fly Catalina flying boats on anti-submarine patrols. He converted to Sunderlands at Mombassa on 209 Sqdn. and 57 MU also on Sunderlands until 1953. This included the Berlin airlift in 1948, flying from the river in Hamburg to Havel Lake, and flew in an anti-shipping role in Burma. At the end o fthe war in the Far East he flew form Hong Kong and Singapore until returning to the UK in Spetember 1946. He continued on 201 Sqd. Flying Boats until 1953. Thereafter he was mainly employed on V.I.P. duties flying from Malta, Northolt, Fontainebleau, Bovingdon and White Waltham. He flew 173 ops and 1800 hours on Sunderlands and 1800 hours on Devons out of a total of 6250 flying hours. The last fiver years of his service was as an Air Traffic Controller at R.A.F. Benson and RAF Abingdon.



Flying Officer George Cook
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Flying Officer George Cook

A WOP/AG on Hampdens with 49 Sqn, where he completed 33 Ops. He completed the 2 thousand bomber raids to Cologne and Essen. He then went out to SEAC with 205 Sqn where he completed a full tour of 1000 hours on Operations in a Catalina hunting Japanese submarines.




Flight Lieutenant John Cruickshank VC
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Flight Lieutenant John Cruickshank VC

Joined the Territorial Army in April 1939 and was mobilized for active service at the outbreak of World War II. He served mostly in south east England. In July 1941 he transferred to the RAF for aircrew duties, undergoing pilot training with the US Navy at Pensacola, Florida and gaining his pilot's wings in June 1942. Following a short period with the RAF Ferry Command in Canada and further operational training in the UK he joined 210 Sqdn based at Pembroke Dock, South Wales and later Poole Bay, Dorset. As captain of a Catalina flying boat, he carried out Anti-U-boat patrols in the Bay of Biscay and the Eastern Atlantic Ocean until December 1943. During this period, he carried out a detachment to Gibraltar for similar duties. In early 1944 elements of his Sqdn were moved to Sullom Voe in the Shetland Islands for Anti U-boat duties and General Maritime Reconnaissance in northern waters. In mid July 1944, while on an Anti U-boat patrol west of the Lofoten Islands, they sighted and attacked a surfaced German U-boat. During the attack, the aircraft received extensive damage from the U-boat's armaments also suffering crew casualties. The aircraft remained airborne and returned to base. For this action three members of the crew were decorated with the Distinguished Flying Cross, the Distinguished Flying Medal, and the Victoria Cross. Following this episode, Cruickshank became tour expired and moved to staff duties at Headquarters, Coastal Command, Northwood, near London. He was released from active service in early 1946 and returned to a civilian occupation.



Citation for the Victoria Cross, gazetted 1st September 1944.

This officer was the captain and pilot of a Catalina flying boat which was recently engaged on an anti-submarine patrol over northern waters. When a U-boat was sighted on the surface, Flying Officer Cruickshank at once turned to the attack. In the face of fierce anti-aircraft fire he manoeuvred into position and ran in to release his depth charges. Unfortunately they failed to drop. Flying Officer Cruickshank knew that the failure of this attack had deprived him of the advantage of surprise and that his aircraft offered a good target to the enemys determined and now heartened gunners. Without hesitation, he climbed and turned to come in again. The Catalina was met by intense and accurate fire and was repeatedly hit. The navigator/bomb aimer was killed. The second pilot and two other members of the crew were injured. Flying Officer Cruickshank was struck in seventy-two places, receiving two serious wounds in the lungs and ten penetrating wounds in the lower limbs. His aircraft was badly damaged and filled with the fumes of exploding shells. But he did not falter. He pressed home his attack, and released the depth charges himself, straddling the submarine perfectly. The U-boat was sunk. He then collapsed and the second pilot took over the controls. He recovered shortly afterwards and, though bleeding profusely, insisted on resuming command and retaining it until he was satisfied that the damaged aircraft was under control, that a course had been set for base and that all the necessary signals had been sent. Only then would he consent to receive medical aid and have his wounds attended to. He refused morphia in case it might prevent him from carrying on. During the next five and a half hours of the return flight he several times lapsed into unconsciousness owing to loss of blood. When he came to, his first thought on each occasion was for the safety of his aircraft and crew. The damaged aircraft eventually reached base but it was clear that an immediate landing would be a hazardous task for the wounded and less experienced second pilot. Although able to breathe only with the greatest difficulty, Flying Officer Cruickshank insisted on being carried forward and propped up in the second pilots seat. For a full hour, in spite of his agony and ever increasing weakness, he gave orders as necessary, refusing to allow the aircraft to be brought down until the conditions of light and sea made this possible without undue risk. With his assistance the aircraft was safely landed on the water. He then directed the taxying and beaching of the aircraft so that it could easily be salvaged. When the medical officer went on board, Flying Officer Cruickshank collapsed and he had to be given a blood transfusion before he could be removed to hospital. By pressing home the second attack in his gravely wounded condition and continuing his exertions on the return journey with his strength failing all the time, he seriously prejudiced his chance of survival even if the aircraft safely reached its base. Throughout, he set an example of determination, fortitude and devotion to duty in keeping with the highest traditions of the Service.

London Gazette, 1944.



Lieutenant Commander Nathan Gordon
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9 / 9 / 2008Died : 9 / 9 / 2008
Lieutenant Commander Nathan Gordon

Lt. (jg) Nathan Gordon made four stall landings in his Black Cat PBY in rough waters of Kavieng Harbor to collect ditched survivors of the strike. Coming under intense enemy fire, he and his crew located and picked up 15 Army fliers shot down during the attack. His actions on this day earned him the Medal of Honor. Born in 1916, Nathan Gordon enlisted in 1941, training in Florida until February 1942, joining VP-34 flying PBY Catalinas. In June 1943 the squadron was posted to Hawaii, and subsequently flew missions over Midway and Tarawa, before moving to Australia on anti-shipping raids, then to Samarai Island, where the squadron acquired the nickname Black Cats. It was from here that Nathan Gordon completed the daring rescue mission for which he received the Medal of Honor. Sadly Nathan Gordon died on 9th September 2008.



Sergeant Leopold Heimes
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2009Died : 2009
Sergeant Leopold Heimes

Already in the Belgian Air Force, he moved to 235 Sqn Coastal Command as an Air Gunner on Blenheims during the Battle of Britain before becoming a pilot, flying Spitfires and Catalinas with 350 Sqn before converting to 76 Sqn on Dakotas in India. Heimes stayed in the RAF until September 1951 having been gazetted as a Master Pilot. Sadly, Leopold Heimes died in 2009.



Sydney Hillier
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Sydney Hillier

Sydney Hiller was a member of the crew of Catalina D for Donald of 270 Squadron. The squadron was based for most of the war at Freetown, West Africa. He was a member of the crew when his aircraft launched a surprise attack on u-boat U-515.



Wg. Cdr. V. Hodgkinson DFC, MID, MRAeS
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Wg. Cdr. V. Hodgkinson DFC, MID, MRAeS

Joined the Royal Australian Air Force in 1937 (Service no 463). He was posted to No. 10 Sqdn. RAAF in the UK in January 1940 flying Sunderlands from Pembroke Dock and went on to serve until 1942 flying operations in the Atlantic and Mediterranean from bases in Pembroke Dock, Oban, Plymouth, Gibraltar and Alexandria (Egypt). In 1942 he was posted back to No. 20 Sqdn. in Australia flying Catalinas from Cairns on bombing raids over Japanese bases and anti-shipping patrols throughout the Solomon Islands and north of New Guinea . He went on to complete 44 operations and commanded this squadron until 1943 before becoming Chief Flying Instructor, Catalinas 3 OTU Rathmines. Vic later formed and commanded No. 40 Sqdn. RAAF Sunderlands, Port Moresby, New Guinea until 1945. He retired from the RAAF in 1946 to join BOAC, Hythe, flying their civil Sunderland conversions - Hythes, Sandringhams and Solents. Vic transferred to landplanes in 1950 flying Canadair Argonauts, Bristol Britannias, DH Comet 4s, 707-436s and 336s. Vic retired in 1971 having amassed 19,300 hours, including some 4,300 hours on Flying Boats. In his retirement Vic is currently restoring and maintaining a Sandringham Flying Boat at the Southampton Hall of Aviation.



Oud Adjudand Onderofficier Vlieger Paul Kommer
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Oud Adjudand Onderofficier Vlieger Paul Kommer

Paul Kommer joined the R.NI.N. in August 1940 as Teerling Onderofficier Mieger. In December 1941 he was Korporaal Mieger, flying the Dornier 24 as co-pilot on the Chance Encounter operation, one of his 50 war time combat patrols. After the eventual capitulation of the Netherlands East ladies, he became a prisoner of war and was sent to work in the coal mines in Japan. When war was over he had somehow survived, but he weighed just 94lbs, nearly half of his normal body weight. After the war he flew PBYs with the R.NI.N. and later became an instructor.



Pilot Officer Bill Leckie, AEM, KW
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Pilot Officer Bill Leckie, AEM, KW

Bill Leckie was born in Glasgow, Scotland on 23rd June 1921, joined the Royal Air Force in June 1941 and went to St Johns Wood on the 15th of September 1941. Bill Leckie started his flying training on the 4th of April 1942 at Stoke Orchard near Cheltenham in Tiger Moths. He went to Canada on the 26th of May 1942 at Monkton for further training until June before going on to Detroit and on to Pensacola, Florida on the 1st October 1942, flying Stearman and Catalina Flying boats until 31st March 1943 when Bill went to Prince Edward Island for further training. Back in the UK, Bill was expecting to join a Coastal Command squadron flying Catalinas but was transferred to Bomber Command and a conversion course on to Whitleys at Kinloss Scotland on the 22nd of February 1944, and joined 77 Squadron at Full Sutton on the 19th July 1944 on Halifaxes, flying 6 bombing missions, one being the bombing of the Flying Bomb Factory at Russesheim, before transferring to 148 Special Duties squadron on the 19th of August 1944 and going to Brindisi. Pilot Officer Bill Leckie was involved in the dropping of supplies (guns, ammunition and food) to the Polish during the Warsaw uprising. This was a costly mission and many aircraft were lost. (Bill was flying Halifax JD319 (FS - G). For his efforts in air-dropping supplies during this period, Bill Leckie was awarded the Polish Cross of Valour (KW). Pilot Officer Bill Leckie was also the Pilot for Operation Ebensburg on Sunday 8th April 1945. Halifax B.II Series 1 (Special) JP254 of 148 Special Duties Squadron carried out the misison to drop four SOE agents and their equipment near Alt Aussee salt mine in the Austrian Alps. Thier mission was to secure and protect 6,755 items of the worlds greatest works of art that had been looted and stored by the Germans as they swept across Europe. With the allied forces closing in, the Germans had planned to blow up the entire store to prevent the artworks from falling into the hands of the liberators. Once on the ground, the four agents linked up with local resistance fighters and the mine and its valuable contents were eventually secured, the explosives made safe and the entire cache taken into the safe keeping of the 80th US Infantry Division as the German occupation of Europe crumbled. Bill Leckie stayed with 148 Squadron until 18th May 1945 when he was posted to Cairo with 216 Squadron (Dakotas) of Transport Command and on 1st January 1946 to 78 Squadron flying Dakotas again until 1st June 1946 , finally leaving the RAF on the 18th September 1946.




Captain Robert E Lewis
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Captain Robert E Lewis





Wg. Cdr. A.W.L. Paddy Mahon MBE, C. Eng. MRAeS
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Wg. Cdr. A.W.L. Paddy Mahon MBE, C. Eng. MRAeS

Started his 37 year career in the Royal Air Force in 1930 when he enlisted as an Aircraft Apprentice at Halton. he served as Metal Rigger and later as an Aircraft Fitter on Fleet Air stations and ships, for a while on Queen Bee aircraft. In 1937 he finally succeeded in selection as an Airman Pilot. EFTS at Bristol, SFTS at South Cerney, Maritime Recce at Thorney Island, and finally Flying Boat School at Calshot. There he learned his craft as a Boat pilot on ageing Supermarine Scapas formerly used by 202 Squadron, Malta. On completion he was posted to 228 Squadrion at Pembroke Dock which was in process of re-equipping with Stranraers. In December 1938 he was 2nd pilot on the collection from Rochester of the Squadron's first Sunderland. In June 1939 the Squadron moved to Alexandria for Naval Co-operation Exercises. In addition to these the Sunderlands were used for long range V.I.P. flights and for transport around the Med. In course of these, the crew of which Sgt Mahon was a member, visited Malta, Bizerta, Cairo, Cyprus and for the third time Athens, leaving on 2nd September 1939. The Squadron was ordered home to Pembroke Dock on September 9th and immediately started the round of convoy escorting anti-submarine sweeps and general maritime tasks covering from Norway to Malta. On 24th November Sgt Mahon was one of the crew detailed to search for the Deutschland after it had sunk the armed merchant cruiser Jervis Bay. The operation involved the crew in 15 hours of flying in the most severe weather. Detachments to the Shetlands often meant the whole crew living on the aircraft for several days at a time because the weather prevented small craft coming along side but flying by day continued. In June 1940 he was seconded to 10 RAAF Squadron at Mount Batten to increase their roll of qualified first Pilots. One of his first trips was to convey Lord Gort and Mr Duff Cooper to Rabat on an unsuccessful attempt to persuade the Sultan of Morocco to continue the war on its allies' side. That trip earned the Captain a DFC. In the months he spent with 10 Squadron several trips were made to Malta supporting the Hurricane reinforcement by aircraft carriers conveying essential ground personnel and equipment including one load of several tons of Browning gun links, none of which were held on the island. In February 1941 it was back to two layers of wing. He was posted to 202 Squadron at Gibraltar, which was flying Saro Londons but expected to be re-equipped with Sunderlands. He travelled as a passenger on a 10 Squadron aircraft in company with Anthony Eden and Lord Dill. That trip is recorded in several books on the Sunderland as being special. It was Sgt Mahon's last ever time flying in a Sunderland as 202 Squadron were subsequently re-equipped with Catalinas. The transfer meant flying to UK with a London, a memorable trip of over 15 hours. Qualifying courses at Stranraer on the Catalina led to the ferrying flight back to Gibraltar. Unfortunately on Sgt Mahon's ferry trip the elevator controls failed en route and the attempted landing at Gibraltar using only trim tabs resulted in a serious crash ending his flying career. After a long period of hospital and subsequent rehabilitation, he reverted to his ground trade. He was commissioned into the Technical Branch in which he served until 1967 being awarded the MBE in 1963.



Alex Morrison
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Alex Morrison

Alex Morrison was a member of the crew of Catalina D for Donald of 270 Squadron. The squadron was based for most of the war at Freetown, West Africa. He was a member of the crew when his aircraft launched a surprise attack on u-boat U-515.



Flt. Lt. John Tattersall
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Flt. Lt. John Tattersall

Made his first attempt at becoming a pilot by joining the waiting list for Pilots of Manchester Auxiliary Squadron. He joined the RAF as a clerk in 1940 and remustered Aircrew in May 1941 and by June was on his way to the US Naval Air Service Station, Pensacola, Florida as a member of the first group of students under the TOWER scheme. On his first day solo in October 1941 he crashed and woke up in hospital with a headache and scratched eyebrows. Eleven days later he was flying again and finally gained his wings in May 1942 on Catalinas. Returning to the UK he spent some time flying 'Oxfords' before being posted to 131 OTU, Loch erne, N. Ireland. In January 1943 he passed out as an aircraft Commander and joined 210 Sqdn at Pembroke Dock in February. He spent the next ten months (some 700 flying hours) flying over the Bay of Biscay on Anti-Sub operations including Leigh Leight operations, some convoy and naval co-operation. In January 1944, 210 Sqd. disbanded and he returned for a short spell to 131 OTU before being seconded to BOAC in April 1944. With BOAC he flew on the civil version of the Sunderland and 'c' class flying boats thence landplanes - Arginaut, Comet, Britannias (102 and 312) and VC10s retiring in 1973 to a ground job as Flight Crew Executive until May 1976.



Flt. Lt. Ron Vaughan, DFC
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Flt. Lt. Ron Vaughan, DFC

Joined the RAFVR in December 1940 and trained as a pilot-cadet with the US Navy at Pensacola, Florida. After further Coastal Command training in the UK, he joined 10 OTU (detachment) at St Eval, Cornwall. The tour was completed, as a Whitley co-pilot, on U-boat patrols over the Bay of Biscay, between December 1942 and March 1943. After training for command on the Catalina, he joined 210 Sqdn at Sullom Voe, Shetland from June 1943 to October 1944. In October 1943, with all landing areas closed with fog, his Catalina, out of fuel, ditched in the Atlantic, west of the Shetlands. It had remained airborne for 22 hours and then survived, on the water, for a further 18 hours before the crew were rescued. The pigeon which had carried the SOS message to base, later received the 'Dicken Medal' (Animal VC) for flying over 60 miles, in fog, in nine hours! In May 1944, U-boat 394 was attacked in northern waters, without success. On 18th July 1944, U-boat 742 was sunk 180 miles west of the Lofoten Islands, off Norway. The Catalina was badly holed but managed to return to base, 500 miles in six and a quarter hours, on the port engine. F/Lt John Cruickshank had sunk U-361 on the previous day, from the same Arctic U-boat Flotilla. F/Lt Vaughan instructed on Catalinas in Northern Ireland and was then posted to India, yo join Catalina 240 Sqdn in Madras, and then until VJ Day with Liberator Sqdn 357 in Ceylon. He left the RAF in 1946 having flown Halifax 7, at Linton and Cranwell. He joined BOAC and captained many types of aircraft for 29 years before retiring in 1975.



Cdr Cole Windham USN
Click the name above to see prints signed by Cdr Cole Windham USN
Cdr Cole Windham USN

Cole Windham was born in West Columbia, South Carolina on April 29, 1912. At the age of six Cole remembers standing on a brick wall in front of his home and watching a platoon of WW1 soldiers marching toward him. As they came abreast he saluted, and the platoon leader returned the salute. It was a vivid memory that lasted a life time. His family moved to Gastonia, North Carolina in the early 1920s. Cole finished high school there, and was awarded a full academic scholarship to attend Davidson College. Following his graduation in 1936, Cole joined the Navy as an aviation cadet. After earning his wings, Cole's first assignment was with VP-19 flying P2Y-3s out of Seattle, Washington and Sitka, Alaska. In 1939 he was reassigned to VP-33 flying PBYs out of Panama. When war broke out in Europe in 1939, President Rooselvelt, fearing for the safety of American shipping in neutral waters, organized The Neutrality Patrol. Cole was sent with a detachment of aircraft to Key West, Florida. There he remained busy, flying every day, and reporting the positions and information on all shipping in the area. In 1940 he was transferred to VP-71 flying the PBY-5. This squadron operated from British Guyana to Iceland. Cole flew a number of antisubmarine patrols around lend lease convoys carrying supplies to England and Russia. He also flew survey flights out of Guyana to recommend a location for a search and rescue seaplane base. In May of 1941 eleven aircraft in Cole's squadron were enlisted in the search for the German Battleship Bismarck. In an unsuccessful flight of more than seventeen hours in duration, Cole experienced some very difficult weather conditions which required constant instrument flying. The aircraft were only able to return safely by radioing their ship for a bearing. Under the conditions, it was remarkable that all eleven aircraft and crews made it back safely. With America's entry into the War in December of 1941, Cole was assigned to Kaneohe Bay in Hawaii. There he would fly long 700 mile patrols to protect the islands from any additional attacks. He was then transferred to the Coral Sea to fly patrols for the U.S fleet prior to the Battle of the Coral Sea. Upon return to Hawaii in 1942, Cole was transferred back to the States and given Staff Duty with the Amphibious Forces. At war's end in 1946, he returned to civilian life, and joined Pan American Airways as a pilot. Following a successful career in commercial aviation, Cole has settled down in Asheville, North Carolina with his bride of fifty years. He enjoys telling his treasured sea stories to his two daughters, three grandchildren and great grandson.


Squadrons for : Catalina
A list of all squadrons from known to have used this aircraft. A profile page is available by clicking the squadron name.
SquadronInfo

No.202 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 1st April 1918

Semper vigilate - Be always vigilant

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No.202 Sqn RAF

Full profile not yet available.

No.205 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 1st April 1918
Fate : Disbanded 31st October 1971

Pertama di Malaya - First in Malaya

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No.205 Sqn RAF

Full profile not yet available.

No.209 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 1st April 1918
Fate : Disbanded 31st December 1968
City of Hong Kong

Might and main

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No.209 Sqn RAF

Full profile not yet available.

No.210 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 1st April 1918
Fate : Disbanded 15th November 1971

Yn y nwyfre yn hedfan - Hovering in the heavens

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No.210 Sqn RAF

Full profile not yet available.

No.240 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 20th August 1918
Fate : Disbanded 8th January 1963

Sjo-Vordur Lopt-Vordur - Guardian of the sea, guardian of the sky

Click the name above to see prints featuring aircraft of No.240 Sqn RAF

No.240 Sqn RAF

Full profile not yet available.

No.259 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : August 1918
Fate : Disbanded 30th April 1945

Haya ingia napigane - Get in a fight

Click the name above to see prints featuring aircraft of No.259 Sqn RAF

No.259 Sqn RAF

Full profile not yet available.

No.265 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : August 1918
Fate : Disbanded 30th April 1945

Click the name above to see prints featuring aircraft of No.265 Sqn RAF
No.265 Sqn RAF

Full profile not yet available.

No.270 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 6th April 1919
Fate : Disbanded 30th June 1945

Click the name above to see prints featuring aircraft of No.270 Sqn RAF
No.270 Sqn RAF

Full profile not yet available.

No.321 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 1st June 1940
Fate : Disbanded 8th December 1945
Dutch

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No.321 Sqn RAF

Full profile not yet available.

No.330 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 25th April 1941
Fate : Disbanded 21st November 1945
Norwegian

Trygg havet - Guarding the seas

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No.330 Sqn RAF

Full profile not yet available.

No.333 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 5th May 1943
Fate : Disbanded 21st November 1945
Norwegian

For Konge, Fedreland og flaggets heder - For King, country and the honour of the flag

Click the name above to see prints featuring aircraft of No.333 Sqn RAF

No.333 Sqn RAF

Full profile not yet available.

No.350 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 12th November 1941
Fate : Disbanded 24th October 1946
Belgian

Belgae gallorum fortissimi - The Belgae, bravest of the Gauls

Click the name above to see prints featuring aircraft of No.350 Sqn RAF

No.350 Sqn RAF

Full profile not yet available.

No.413 Sqn RCAF

Country : Canada
Founded : 1st July 1941
Fate : Disbanded 23rd February 1945
Tusker

Ad vigilamus undis - We watch the waves

Click the name above to see prints featuring aircraft of No.413 Sqn RCAF

No.413 Sqn RCAF

Full profile not yet available.

 



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