Kiwi Strike by Nicolas Trudgian. - NicolasTrudgianPrints .com

You currently have no items in your basket


Buy with confidence and security!
Publishing historical art since 1985


Valuations

Classified Ads Terms and Conditions Shipping Info Contact Details
Aircraft
Search
Squadron
Search
Signature
Search
Artist
Search
Tank
Search
SPECIAL OFFERS
Product Search         
(Exact match search - please check our other menus above first)
CLICK HERE FOR A FULL LIST OF ALL NICOLAS TRUDGIAN PRINTS BY TITLE
Massive savings on this month's big offers including our BUY ONE GET ONE HALF PRICE offer on many prints and many others at HALF PRICE or with FREE PRINTS!
Many of our offers end in 0 hours, 38 minutes!
View our Special Offers
THIS ITEM IS INCLUDED IN OUR BUY ONE GET ONE HALF PRICE OFFER !
Choose any two prints in this special offer and the lower priced item is half price. (Any free bonus prints already supplied with an item are separate and will also be included !)
Hundreds of items across our websites are included in this offer!

Kiwi Strike by Nicolas Trudgian.


Kiwi Strike by Nicolas Trudgian.

A dramatic low-level attack on a Japanese base near Rabaul is in progress by F-4U Corsairs of 16 Squadron, RNZAF. Taking the lead is Bryan Cox, as the Corsairs leave a trail of smoke and debris in their wake. Water vapor is squeezed out of the humid atmosphere as Coxs wingman banks sharply to avoid groundfire. The Kiwi Corsairs buccaneered their way through the intensly fought campaigns in the Solomons and Guadalcanal.
Item Code : DHM2443Kiwi Strike by Nicolas Trudgian. - This EditionAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout! Buy 1 Get 1 Half Price!
TYPEDESCRIPTIONSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSPRICEPURCHASING
PRINT Signed limited edition of 800 prints.

Paper size 16 inches x 14 inches (41cm x 36cm) Cox, Bryan
+ Artist : Nicolas Trudgian
50 Off!Now : 50.00

Quantity:
SAVE MONEY WITH OUR DISCOUNT DOUBLE PRINT PACKS!

Buy With :
HMS Anson at Sydney Harbour, July 1945 by Ivan Berryman.
for 125 -
Save 115

Buy With :
The Black Sheep by Nicolas Trudgian (B)
for 215 -
Save 125
SAVE MONEY WITH OUR TRADE DISCOUNT MULTI-PRINT PACKS - AVAILABLE DIRECT TO OUR CUSTOMERS AT THESE PRICES!
Big Trudgian and Berryman Aviation Prints.

Pack price : 240 - Save 360

                
Buy With :
7 other prints in this pack :
CLICK HERE TO VIEW OR PURCHASE

Pack price : 240 - Save 360

Titles in this pack :
Black Cat Rescue by Nicolas Trudgian.  (View This Item)
Invasion Force by Nicolas Trudgian.  (View This Item)
Kiwi Strike by Nicolas Trudgian.  (View This Item)
Trainbusters by Nicolas Trudgian.  (View This Item)
The Struggle for Malta by Ivan Berryman. (F)  (View This Item)
LCT 312 by Ivan Berryman. (D)  (View This Item)
Typhoons Over Normandy by Ivan Berryman. (D)  (View This Item)
Dinah Might by Ivan Berryman.  (View This Item)

All prices on our website are displayed in British Pounds Sterling



Other editions of this item : Kiwi Strike by Nicolas Trudgian DHM2443
TYPEDESCRIPTIONSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSPRICEPURCHASING
ARTIST
PROOF
Limited edition of 80 artist proofs.

Only 20 copies available of this sold out edition.
Paper size 16 inches x 14 inches (41cm x 36cm) Cox, Bryan
+ Artist : Nicolas Trudgian
10 Off!Add any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!Now : 95.00VIEW EDITION...
Extra Details : Kiwi Strike by Nicolas Trudgian.
About all editions :



A photograph of an edition of the print.

Signatures on this item
NameInfo
The signature of Warrant Officer Bryan Cox

Warrant Officer Bryan Cox
Born in 1925, this New Zealand fighter pilot Bryan Cox flew Corsairs in the Pacific. On January 14th, 1945, 36 Kiwi Corsairs based on Green Island were sent to attack the Japanese base at Rabaul. Flight Lieutenant Francis George Keefe in one of the Corsairs was shot down by flak and his parachute was seen opening and landing in the water. The following day Bryan Cox along with fifteen other Corsair pilots of 14 sqd and 16 Sqd were sent on the rescue mission for Keefe, escorting a flying boat. A raft was dropped and the mission may have been a success, except Francis Keefe was picked up by a Japanese patrol boat, and died of gangrene from his many wounds 10 days later in a prison camp. Returning to base, the 16 Corsair pilots encountered a bad storm, but due to lack of fuel could not fly around the strom and instead had to go through it. Bryan Cox was separated from the rest of the Corsairs when his radio and light went out due to a cockpit failure and Bryan veered away in fear of a mid air collision, not managing to regain contact whith the others. Seven pilots were lost at sea, from 14 Sqd. Flight Lieutenant BS Hay, Flying Officer AN Saward, Flight Sergeant IJ Munro, Flight Sergeant JS McArthur, and from 16 Sqd, Flight Sergeant RW Albrecht, Flight Lieutenant TRF Johnson, and Flying Officer G. Randell. Bryan Cox with only minutes of fuel left and contemplating ditching finally saw the outline of Green Island and managed with not more than seconds of fuel remaining to land. After the war Bryan was to become one of New Zealands best known flying instructors, and he spent many years as Chief Instructor at Ardmore, now a popular civil aerodrome which was the same airfield that Cox had been based at flying the Corsairs. Following the end of the war, Bryan had served in J Force, with No.14 Squadron RNZAF flying duties in Japan. He was an early observer to the horrors of Hiroshima. He served there untill 1947, and is secretary of the New Zealand fighter pilots association.

This Week's Half Price Art

 10th May 1972. Lt. Curt Dose together with his RIO, LCDR Jim McDevitt line up their F-4J Phantom prior to landing on the USS Constellation following their first successful target CAP of the day. During this mission they claimed a MiG-21F after a ultra-low level supersonic flight over the North Vietnamese airfield of Kep, northeast of Hanoi.
Silver Kite 211 by Philip West. (Y)
Half Price! - 65.00
 This sortie was for the sole purpose of saving lives. The objective was to initiate a breakout of more than 700 French resistance workers from Amiens prison, many of whom were on their eve of execution by their Gestapo jailers. The De Havilland Mosquito FB Mk V1s of 464 and 487 Squadron of No 140 wing were to breach the outer walls and destroy certain key buildings within the compound.  Absolute pin point precision was vital to reduce casualties amongst the French patriots.  Three formations of six aircraft were formed, each crewed by the most experienced members of these squadrons. Low level runs at only fifteen feet were required to maintain bombing accuracy. The raid was the responsibility of  Group Captain Percy Charles Pickard, DSO, DFC. The navigational plot was in the hands of Pickards inseparable friend and navigator, Flight Lieutenant J A Bill Broadley. The operation took place on the 18th Februrary 1944 in terrible weather, with heavy snow falling, sweeping in gusts and almost obscuring the runway.  The first run took place along the Albert to Amiens road which can be seen in the foreground of the painting. Led by Wing Commander I S Black, the aircraft were flying so low they had to be flown at an angle to miss the trees lining the road. Bombs were placed with pin point accuracy, breaching the walls in places and setting fire to the main building. The second attack at right angles to the first across barren open fields was led by Wing Commander R W Bob Iredale followed by the Australians of 464 Squadron. The target being the second phase demolition of the guards annex.  The painting shows Iredale in the foreground with his navigator Flt. Lt. McCaul, followed closely by Sqn Ldr Sugden and navigator Fg Off Bridger. In the background, comimg up rapidly at a height of fifteen feet is Fg Off Mongham, DFM and his navigator Fg Off Dean DFM.  These two attacks were so successful, that streams of prisoners managed to escape. Further bombing runs were deemed unnecessary and 21 Squadron returned to base.
Liberation from Amiens by Tim Fisher. (P)
Half Price! - 1400.00
 Projected nightfighter development of the Do335 with Jumo 222 engines and long span wings.

Dornier 435 by David Pentland. (GS)
Half Price! - 250.00
 Norwegian pilots, forming 331 and 332 Squadrons, were to prove themselves a brave and formidable force following their formation in 1942. Here, two Spitfire Mk IXCs of 332 Sqn break to starboard, the nearest aircraft being that of Kapt. Finn Thorsager.

A Norwegian Tribute by Ivan Berryman. (AP)
Half Price! - 80.00

 Flying Sopwith Snipe E8102 on 27th October 1918, Major William Barker encountered a flight of fifteen Fokker D.VIIs and decided to take them on single handed. Having downed one enemy aircraft, Barker was wounded in his left thigh and momentarily fainted. Coming to, he found another D.VII ahead of him and immediately resumed the battle. Another bullet now tore into his right leg and another shattered his left elbow. Despite his terrible injuries, Barker shot down three D.VIIs and drove the others off before crash landing his bullet-riddled Snipe in friendly territory. He survived the crash and was awarded the VC for his gallantry on this epic flight.

Major William Barker VC, DSO - Nearly an Ace in a Day by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
Half Price! - 250.00
 On the 20th of April 1918, just one day before his death, the legendary Red Baron, Mannfred von Richthofen, claimed his final victory.  His famous Flying Circus was engaged in battle by Sopwith Camels of No.3 and No.201 Squadron.  Claiming his 79th victory, he had shot down Major Richard Raymond-Barker earlier in the dogfight - the British pilot being killed in the resulting crash.  However, it is his 80th and final victory that is depicted here.  In the centre of the painting, the Sopwith Camel of David Lewis has been brought into the firing line of von Richthofen, and is about to be sent down in flames from the sky - Lewis was fortunate to survive the encounter relatively unscathed.  Meanwhile the chaos of the dogfight is all around this duel, with aircraft of both sides wheeling and diving in combat.  The other pilots depicted are Weiss, Bell, Riley, Steinhauser, Mohnicke, Hamilton and Wenzl.

The Final Curtain by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - 70.00
 From June 1940 on, Adolf Galland flew as a of III./JG 26, fighting in the Battle of britain with 109-Emils from bases in the Pas de Calais.  During the Battle of Britain, in a legendary front line General Officer briefing on Luftwaffe tactics, Hermann Goring asked what his pilots needed to win the battle.  Galland replied: <i>I should like an outfit of Spitfires for my squadron.</i>  Göring was speechless with rage.  It is important that this remark is not taken out of context, because Galland also stated (in his autobiography) that <i>of course fundamentally I preferred our Me109 to the Spitfire</i>.  This apparent contradiction was due to his view that because the Spitfire was more manoeuvreable he considered it more suitable to the role of defensive fighter than the Bf 109, though he actually thought that fighters should not be used in a defensive role anyway.  When Galland made the much quoted comment about the Spitfires to Göring he was <i>unbelievably vexed at the lack of understanding and stubbornness with which the command gave us orders we could not execute</i> and so made the comment as a retort to Göring.

Me109 - Adolf Galland by Jason Askew. (P)
Half Price! - 400.00
 It was in 1941 that the remarkable Focke-Wulfe FW190 first appeared in the skies of Europe, quickly establishing itself as a most formidable adversary. It proved to be the supreme weapon against all allied bomber forces. Here FW190A-8 of 1 Gruppe, Jagdgesschwader 1 is shown attacking a B17G of 381st Bomb Group during a critical defence of the Reich in 1944.

Cat Among the Pigeons (FW190) by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - 60.00

 



Subscribe to our newsletterReturn to Front Page